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MyBreakingViews 10 Travel Hacks In Seeing The World

Today I will be sharing MyBreakingViews 10 travel hacks in seeing the world. Come on let’s get into it!

1. Study Exchange.

I can’t say this enough, do a study exchange if you are at uni/college of course. Yes those of you that are in those establishments should have lots of option to do a study exchange. Please do not make any excuses! Just go for it! I had a former friend that had the opportunity to travel abroad whilst at University; she didn’t take this up and now regrets it!

Study exchanges are the absolute best!! And if you ever need advice about going to do a study exchange programme drop me a line.

2. Create a bucket list

I always have a list of countries I would like to travel and as it’s said write your visions down and make it a reality. I recently wrote a post on the importance of visiting a new country every year. Check it out – Make It A Habit To Visit A New Country Yearly.

My bucket list includes me going to at least one country in every continent in the world. Yep, I have said I will do all this before I am 30.

3. Get to know these flight website deals.

There are so many to choose from;  PirateHolidays, Secret Escapes, Groupon, Onthebeach, Lastminute.com, Google Flights, Edream and Skyscanner . If I have to pick one, Skyscanner has to be my absolute fave they have recently input a multi-city section which allows you to do more than one city at once – but it only really works in your favour if you are quite open on the dates you want to travel.

If you can kill two birds with one stone and the countries are close by, go for it. I love going to a few places at a time. Just don’t be like my friend who travelled from America to Iceland to Spain. The weather changes required a heavy suitcase.  It’s difficult to pack for a number of weathers.

4. Do short breaks

Depending on where you live this may work out really well for you. I personally hate, staying in a country for longer than 5 days if I’m honest with you, I get exhausted and I can’t wait to get back to normality of life. Sad I know but I feel there is only so much you can do for a long period of time and if it’s not going back home (for me Nigeria) I don’t want to be there for too long. Living in the UK helps as you sometimes don’t even need 5 days and short flights mean you can travel during the weekends; if you have a 9-5 like me you will want to utilise the holidays you get.

5. Don’t be shy away from hostels

I’ve stayed in a number of hostels. They were very clean and accommodating. I had some horrible and amazing experiences. The thing with hostels is there is a terrible stigma that they are gross, which in actual fact they are very cheap and can be extremely nice. When travelling in South East Asia I stayed in actually really nice hotels/hostels.

The best websites I used when travelling was Hostels Worldwide.

6. Pack smart

I say this with caution. I originally was going to say pack light, which in essence I did when I was travelling Asia (my friends will lie and say otherwise) LOL .  I would say pack smart and only pack what you need. I see people packing things they don’t need a lot of the time and then realising they haven’t taken what they really need. Believe me it’s annoying although I am the biggest culprit in this. Pack for each day and night it’s so much easier that way and if you want to bring things back you have enough room.

7. Sign up to those flight deal newsletters.

I know those deals can become annoying. I was a big lover of Groupon until I realised that 8-10 emails a day was just not cutting it. I do get the occasional flight sales from Ryanair, EasyJet and Onthebeach just because I have booked with them before; they do tend to save me a great deal of money.

Sign up to MyBreakingViews for extra tips of course!

8. Give feedback when due hotels, flights & travels

I don’t know if you know this but this can help if you book with a large organisation like booking.com they work around the world and if you give feedback sometimes you may get discounts on your next hotel booking.

If you book with this link- MyBreakingViews Booking  you can get £15 pounds off your first hotel booking!!!!

Every bit helps.

9. Try and know someone in the country you’re visiting.

Do you have a country you would like to go and know someone who lives there? This is not easy for everyone I know, but for me doing my study exchange has given me friends that live around the world. I now have friends that I can stay with when I want to travel.

10. Don’t keep refreshing the website!

When your booking your travels just be sure not to keep refreshing (turning cookies off are a myth in my opinion). If they see someone is interested in buying flights/hotels they will bump up the prices, believe me I’ve seen it happen in less than 5 mins. When 4 of my friends and I booked to go Hong Kong my friends booked their flights before and within 5 mins the flights had increased by $50 Singaporean dollars about £25. I wasn’t impressed.

Do you have any hacks that you could share with me on travelling?

MBV

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Make It A Habit To Visit A New Country Yearly.

You should always make it a habit to visit a new country.

I regret not documenting my stay in Singapore on a blog or a vlog. As many of you may know, when I moved to Singapore. I took it with both hands and also travelled to other countries in South East Asia. I am now and so will not allow the past to stop me from talking about my recent travels. For me, talking/writing about it brings it back to life – so you will all be doing me a favour!

as for me I regret to say that I forget ever boarding the plane there and even travelling to the other countries


Since I started travelling, I have made a conscious decision to travel home (Nigeria) every 1-2 years. And so far, I have achieved that. For me it’s been important to know my roots. Every time I do travel to Nigeria – which is well known for her rich culture and traditions. I learn something new about my family and the country. That’s hugely important for me. I have also, which brings me to the title of this blog post. Made it a command to myself that I travel to a new country every year. Not just a new country but a country that I would never ever expect myself to go to. Last year I visited Nigeria. Iceland, Spain, Germany and Morocco. All brand new to me (except Nigeria of course). 


Brand new; what does that mean to someone. What that means to me is that EVERY single time I make the horrid journey to the airport. Go through security and get some nice perfume or make-up from the Duty-Free Shop. There is something brand new about each journey. I notably always forget the experience of the airport which, believe it or not, I hate!  Yeah if you’re always the friend holding everyone – which I always am, it becomes a dread. 

Travel Memories

The things I do love more than compensate though:- the  different cultures, the different environments, the food. Which is mostly very new to me (I’m a pushover for trying new things – I’ve eaten duck feet before; don’t ask!). The architecture, the sense of a different identity, a different life somewhere else in another part of the world; heck even the political structure is usually completely different to my own here in the UK. 


I hope not to disappoint my readers so soon. But my travels will be coming to a slight default this year. Concentrating on more home grounded things and taking a hiatus on my travels . And taking a token off my friends book – “these countries are not going anywhere”.  I shall rekindle my travel-lust in the near future.


While I may not currently be travelling as I may have led you to expect. I do hope you learn the importance of going somewhere new – as often as you can.


What Have I Gained From Travelling?

The most important thing I’ve gained is that my character develops every time I go somewhere new. I always learn something new. I come back with an understanding of a particular moment in my life. That I didn’t get to understand when I was home. Interesting I know. But it might even be as little as learning something about the person you travel with or about yourself. All I know is that I always come back with something!


So I urge you to join me and travel somewhere different this and every year. Open yourself up to learn something new about the people around you and most importantly, about yourself – yes, this self!

So, where are you hoping to go this year? Wishing you an adventurous journey of discovery!

Also Read: MyBreakingViews 10 Travel Hacks In Seeing The World

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My First Nigerian Wedding Experience In Nigeria!

As I have been writing about my stay in Nigeria check it out on Nigerians Travel Too – Tales from Lagos -an IJGB’s Version

I thought I should carry on by sharing my cuz wedding that I attended last year. It was the first Nigerian wedding that I had been to in Nigeria and it was Ammmmazzzzzing! It was quite an experience for me as most; if not all Nigerian weddings I have attended have been in the UK so going to a Nigerian wedding in Nigeria and being a bridesmaid – well it was just an absolute honour.

The Big Day

The wedding started from the day I arrived in Nigeria, which was a day before the actual event lol (I know I’m terrible)! My cousin and his wife had lots of last min prep as you can imagine.

Fast forward to the BIG DAY!!….. The wedding was in Ikeja so we stayed in a hotel near the venue, the night before.

We was all supposed to be at the venue from 7 am in the morning,  (that was not happening) but I woke up at 6:30 am so clearly we didn’t start on time (don’t judge me please I was very tired).  I still had the audacity to make time for breakfast, don’t ask me how.

Getting ready

First thing was hair and make-up and traditional outfits, which was for the traditional wedding. In short, the traditional wedding is a tradition for Nigerians (it can vary between tribes) It usually involves both families meeting each other (the bride and the groom). The groom comes to the bride’s family and asks for her hand in marriage, with lots of gifts. The bride usually takes her time at this point to arrive at the venue (gotta keep the man waiting lol) It’s usually ends with lots and lots of dancing; music and of course lots of money hahaha !

The second stage of the wedding is where we do the white wedding. For me this is when we Turrrrrrn Up! This is where we do the traditional blessings, or English marriage ceremony.

Here are a few pictures from the wedding #MayD17 #MayD2017

❤

Congrats to Mayowa and Dipo

I hope you enjoyed the pictures.

I will be writing a post on why I think it’s important to go home (Nigeria for me) and some things you can do in Nigeria so stay tuned…

In the meantime, I would love to hear about any traditional weddings you have been to in the world.

Please do share in the comments below!

Video : @ladimilanfilms

Planner: @mimiluxe_events

Wedding Dress: @tubo_

Makeup: @arabridals

Suit: @kimonokollection

Hair: @jodyscurlbox

Bridesmaid Dresses @elpismegalio

Also Read: Interview|NigeriansOfEngland

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Tales from Lagos -an IJGB’s Version | Nigerians Travel Too

See original article here – Tales from Lagos -an IJGB’s Version 

NTT: Do you feel like Nigeria is home? 

MBV: Yes and No. When I go to Nigeria, I do feel like I am home. It’s a weird feeling though. I belong as regards my skin colour- I’m black and the majority of the people in Nigeria are black so that really feels like home. I enjoy the food, Yam and Egg for breakfast to be exact! (Could literally eat this for breakfast everyyyy dayyyyliterarily!) Egusi and pounded yam for lunch and my cousin makes this amazing Indomie noodles with peppers and other ingredients, so I would have that for dinner.

I ENJOY the sunshine! And I love just feeling like I am home. Nigeria is funny because when you are there there’s a sort of “Wooow everyone looks like me” (Well, kind of) and then I open my mouth to speak and then you see it- You see how they look at you differently. I know the locals know I’m not Nigerian. They usually call me Queen of America – which is always amusing and annoying because I’ve never lived in America.

IJGB

I’m British born and bred. So I know that they don’t know where I’m from, but they know I’m from abroad. They know that I’m not really one of them. They give you a look like yeah this one ‘Just Got Back’ which I believe is a thing now? #IJGB A.K.A I Just Got Back! They know that I am not one of them and in that moment I speak, I am reminded that I’m not really home. In my head, I pretend that I’m home and that’s usually up to 3 weeks and my time is up!

So do I feel like I am home when I visit Nigeria? Yes and no again. I’m in a place that I wish was better, more socially acceptable, shined as much as it should because Nigeria has so much going for her. I wish I could call it my home but really and truly, I know I have to swallow the hard pill and accept that it’s not really ever been my home and most likely never will be.

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Nigerian Sunshine Suits Me. ☀️??

A post shared by Adebola of #MyBreakingViews (@mybreakingviews) on

NTT: What issues infuriate you about Nigeria?

MBV: What doesn’t infuriate a fellow Nigerian about Nigeria? The last time I visited, I was there for my cousin’s wedding #MayD2017, which was in Lagos and then I decided to stay for Christmas. This is the longest I’ve ever stayed in Lagos. I usually stay in Delta state which is another ball game compared to Lagos. Delta for those of us who have never been is very quiet and civilised compared to Lagos.

Anyway, there was petrol scarcity, not to mention the traffic. As much as I could see this infuriate my cousins, I don’t believe it affected me as much, because they ensured that I was still able to go out and have fun. One thing I noticed was that Uber fares had gone up because of the petrol scarcity, but being from the UK, I think the taxi fares were still considerably cheaper when compared to London prices. The only thing that really really really infuriated me and yes I have to say “really” 4 times because it’s the only thing that drives me mad – is mosquito bites!! Oh my gosh! They’re devils! (I feel like they are secretly plotting for my next return as I write this LMAO!) I truly believe the mosquitoes in Nigeria are on steroids; they love my blood. I’m sure it’s “fresh blood” for them as the locals call it when they see my bites! Truly, the marks they leave on my skin are on another level. I literally complained everyday about mosquitoes! It must have driven my family mad!

The ultimate winner ..

NTT: What challenges do you face when relating with locals?


MBV: I don’t feel like I have faced any real hard challenges when relating with locals to be honest. When I hear the stories that my cousins tell me, I know I haven’t faced anything to be honest, but I do know that once they hear me speak, they think they can try and bump prices. I know most of us can agree. Luckily enough, most of us come from a home where we know how to bargain, so I know when to use it and that time is always in Nigeria. However, sometimes I can allow it, other times, I have to let them know that I drink garri and water for breakfast, lunch and dinner back home (home being the UK). The best way to get around having to deal with locals is knowing roughly the prices that things should be.

I remember visiting Nigeria a few years ago, I wanted wash my hair. Me being a typical observer I asked my aunt before I left the house how much it should be to wash my hair and she gave me a rough figure of no more than N500. I got to the closest salon and the woman told me N2500. I turned around to leave and she begged me; asked how much I was willing to pay and I said N600. Guess what? She was absolutely fine with the payment and she even styled my hair! The cheek! To be honest I don’t blame them. They clearly hear my accent and think I’m rich LOOOOL, which I will be of course!

NTT: What spots would you recommend as must visit in Lagos?

MBV: There are so many spots for one to hang at in Lagos. I’m afraid in Nigeria, the only thing I know is partying and eating Egusi soup! I also love Afro-beat a bit too much actually and for some reason, Afro-beat sounds much sweeter in Nigeria – you know with the heat and everyone there is just so gingered LOL!

No honestly, I went to the Lekki Conservation Centre with a friend, which was absolutely amazing. I would go there again. There are beautiful animals, a tree house and the Longest Canopy walk in Africa!! My cousin also took me to Takwa Bay beach, which was quite an experience indeed. There are lots of beaches and sites to see, so I know I still have plenty to do when next I’m there. Nigeria is an amazing man!

NTT: Any life hacks for IJGB

MBV: Any life hacks for #IJGB babes? not really, just enjoy life! Go out every night when you are there, turn up and enjoy the sunshine. Carry some mosquito repellent though.

Turn up at every given opportunity

Thank you to Ade (My Breaking Views) for an honestly beautiful interview, I can definitely relate!

My over all hack for IJGBs is to always have some change on you (lower denominations) because nobody ever  has change. They play this game so often you realise later that you’re parting away with your money because you just need to get back on the road. I paid a taxi man in his own coin and he ‘never esperedit’.

I had a 200 naira change with him and he told me he had only 100 naira. I luckily had 150 naira and offered him. Within a twinkle of an eye he produced my 200 naira. It was okay for him to take my 100 naira but it wasn’t alright for him to part away with his 50 naira! Imagine! Always prepare for your visits to Nigeria, You can never be too prepared!

For what you can get up to in Nigeria, stay glued for our next post. You’ll be inspired.

For travel plan support as an IJGB, please talk to us for a trouble free trip- Info@Nigerianstraveltoo.com.

Read also: Could Nigeria Be Home Permanently?

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MyBreakingViews| #TBT VLOG SPECIAL – ICELAND

So, as I said. I wish I could have shared all the countries I have been to. And so I did (well one of them). I went to Iceland last year in August for 5 days. And I must say it was the best country I have been to for a long time. Gathered a few clips of video and pictures. I hope you enjoy my short clip of me exploring Iceland.

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Could Nigeria Be Home Permanently?

Nigeria  is a country estimated of around 167 million people. English being it’s official main language with other languages, Yoruba, Ibo and Hausa. Its main religious beliefs are Christianity, Islam and indigenous beliefs. It is known to be the most populous country in Africa. Nigeria is one-third larger than Texas and is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. The government today is run by a multiparty government which has formally been transitioned from a military to civilian rule.

As I sit in Nigeria I have to say that there is always something incredibly amazing and exciting about going home. Every time I do go back I fall more in love with my parent’s country. My parents are originally from Nigeria and although I was born and raised in England, I still consider Nigeria a country that I can call home.

For me going home has become very personal to me, it goes as far as growing up in a very predominately white neighbourhood where as a young child I knew nothing to very little about either of my parent’s cultures (my mother being Igbo and my father being Yoruba). However, as I have got older I have wanted to gain more knowledge and insight on my parents culture so when I did start going to Nigeria I began to really appreciate the country and gain real excitement  about learning something new, culturally or historically.

 Nigeria as a country, has and is becoming very important to me even up to today.

In the last year, I have encountered a growing number of young people who are considering, or have now gone back to Nigeria to start a new life, and with the lack of opportunities that young people appear to be facing in the UK, the Motherland does seem less far reaching than it has done previously.

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Me In Nigeria-wearing Delta Igbo traditional clothing.

Since I lived in Singapore as a student I have always had interest in moving abroad and starting a new life where there is opportunities for me to take so when my friend sent me this video  ‘Nigeria: the “repats” who have returned. It got me questioning myself on whether I myself would move to Nigeria.

Indeed there seems to be a fresh era of people who want to challenge the stereotypical views of Nigeria which, have been portrayed by the media and for some of us our parents.

But believe me when I say more and more young people are now seeing Africa in a new light and want to challenge the perception of the country by starting industries, building land and improving Nigeria’s country infrastructure and growing economy.

young people are now seeing Africa in a new light…

Someone like me that studied International Politics at Kings College London, being able to go back to Nigeria and get into the political industry has been seen to be a struggle amongst my family and peers. Nigeria  is perceived to be a country that suffers from huge political corruptions. However, there appears to be a new government… The new President Muhammadu Buhari has shown his quest to kill the high levels of corruption that lies heavily in this country (others may disagree).

So would I personally move to Nigeria?

For me I know that it would be exciting I have had past friends and family that have or are currently doing NYC who had said that the locals had said that for us “repats” coming to Nigeria was an adventure. Whilst this stereotype may be true there is a keen interest for “repats” to promote a new image of Nigeria as an upwardly mobile population who have masses of opportunities.

The more the year goes by, I am seeing more migrants return back to Nigeria not only just to visit families and friends, but also to launch business and to start new lives. It is becoming more and more acceptable to see Nigeria as the land where the economy is vastly growing, which inevitably is eradicating the portrayal ‘poverty porn’ image and negative stories of Nigeria.

If I was going to move to Nigeria I would need to convince my Farther first and I think I have a long way getting around that, but it is definitely something that I would never rule out of my life.

I personally would like to think that moving anywhere was an adventure, but at the same time I think that moving to Nigeria is a huge decision that could provide huge benefits for anyone that is willing to grab it with both hands. Even if you do not move at least go home to visit.

I don’t know guys … Maybe it is time to go home.

Remember:  It’s ok if life knocks you down, it’s just not ok if you stay down!

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