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5 Ways to Celebrate Black History Month 2020

This year with the horrific murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, COVID19, and now with #ENDSARS protest in Nigeria, the world has been forced to recognise the reality of racism and mistreatment towards Black people. Many would have ignored it before. However, this year many have decided to commit themselves educating themselves via social media, books, and more.

When is Black History Month 2020?

Black History Month begins from Thursday the 1st of October, to Saturday the 31st of October, 2020.

What is Black History Month?

Black History Month is celebrated in various countries around the world. It began as a way of remembering the importance of Black people and history. 

In the United Kingdom, Black History Month was first celebrated in October 1987. It started through the leadership of Ghanaian analyst Akyaaba Addai-Sebo, who had served as a coordinator of special projects for the Greater London Council (GLC).

This post would normally, have covered a list of events to attend for Black History Month. I thought and thought about ways to celebrate Black History Month this year, and I think the best way was to do this is virtually. 

Read on to find out a few different ways to get involved with Black History Month this year.

1. Write down what it means to be Black

As a Black woman, I sometimes keep myself busy. So busy that I don’t realise what is happening around me. It sometimes helps me block at the reality of things that are happening to people that look like me. It’s easy to forget how hard you are working as a Black person sometimes. Not to mention the horrific events that have gone on throughout this year – it can all be a bit much!

This year has hit our community the hardest – we are tired, hurt, angry, raging, and did I say tired? Sometimes I feel we are constantly fighting for freedom, equal rights; and to just live in a world that is everyday working against us.

Try and use this month to write something kind to yourself. Talk about why your skin shines, how your hair beautifully stands out in a crowd. Why your melanin is popping? Remind yourself how far you’ve come as a Black individual. 

If you are not Black, maybe write the work and struggle a Black person has to go through. It’s not for you to feel upset or guilty about, but maybe time for you to reflect on the fight we are forever fighting.

2. Do Black Pound Month

Black Pound Day simply encourages us to help Black business for a day. However, it doesn’t have to be just one day! Celebrate it the whole month heck make it a lifestyle!

3. Think of ways Black History Month can be brought into the workplace

Diversity in the Workplace

Let’s be honest the more diverse a workplace is the better the decisions. By taking value in diversity a workforce is required to be innovative and have a much wider perspective on policy, projects and more. It allows the status quo to be challenged. 

Work with your team/department to think of how Black History Month can be recognised this month – maybe organise for a speaker to come in, or organise a virtual event?

4. Read and Educate Yourself on Black History

I’m one that needs to get back on this. Start reading books. I’ve been reading Why I No Longer Talk To White People About Race for the longest time. Honestly, there are things in this book that have made me take a step back.

I am learning every single day, read, learn the history and don’t be afraid to ask questions and be corrected.

5. Don’t Pressure Yourself

There seems to be a lot of pressure sometimes to be seen doing something. Own it and celebrate it in your way and time. Being Black is not a fashion its a lifestyle. I wake up Black and go to sleep Black. 

Not to mention we are also living in a global pandemic so, please don’t put too much pressure on yourself. 

There are so many things you can do to celebrate, so many that I haven’t mentioned. Black Travel Creators are collaborating with Grenada Tourism Board to give content creators a taste of the Island – Grenada. Interested? Sign up here. We are also looking for Black Travel Content Creators that have a UK based audience. 

What will you be doing to celebrate Black History Month? Leave in the comments below. 

Day 1- Luce over at perselem and

Day 2- Beth over at thoughtsofarealredhead then

Day 3- Jessie over at wandererandtraveller

Day 4- Rhiannon over at mrssleejones and

Day 5- Haley over at introvertedcreativity then

Day 6- Karalee over at talesofbelle and

Day 7- Kim over at chimmyville then

Day 8- Kirsty over at kirstymarie and finally me

Day 9- Adebola over at mybreakingviews

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7 Laws You Should Know About Singapore

Happy New Year everyone! I would like to welcome you all to my first Singapore special. This month will be seven years since I moved to Singapore for my study abroad, so to mark this special moment we are going to be looking at seven Singaporean laws you should know before visiting.

We will be learning the difference between travelling to Singapore as a tourist and living there as a student, where to go and much more. You don’t want to miss out so be sure to follow me on Instagram and subscribe to the blog!

Singapore, to some degree, is seen as a city-state with culture, local and international cuisine and real iconic attractions. It is one of the cleanest countries I have ever lived and visited. But there’s more, the country is also famous for its strictness with laws and considering I was able to live there for over 6 months and not once get arrested, I think I did pretty well ( hey just saying).  

When I moved to Singapore in 2013, I knew I was going to need to learn about the laws of the country. Some of their laws include the ban of chewing gum, not being allowed to walk in your house naked, not flushing the toilet and more. If you will be heading to Singapore soon then here are a few laws that you need to be aware of.

7 Strict Laws you should be mindful of before travelling to Singapore  

Exchange Rate: 1 SGD (Singaporean Dollar) = £0.56 GBP (Pound Sterling) AND 1 SGD = $0.74 (American Dollar)- You may need to to convert the punishments. 

For other conversation rates I use XE:Covert.

1. Yes chewing gum is illegal in Singapore  

chewing gum is banned in singapore

I said it. Yes, I was more shocked than you when I read about this in 2013! Chewing gum is wholly forbidden, which explains how clean the streets are in Singapore.  

I wouldn’t want to be caught bringing chewing gum into the country so don’t even think about selling it and certainly don’t import it. 

Punishment: Selling chewing gum can result in fines of S$100,000 (Singapore dollars) and up to 2 years in prison.  

2. Feeding Pigeons in Singapore can get you into trouble 

I’m not a big fan of pigeons myself, so this law is music to my ears, but bird lovers, please take note. You could face a fine if you are caught sharing your food with a local pigeon.  

Punishment: S$500 fine 

3. Begging in the streets is illegal in Singapore  

singapore streets

I remember living in Singapore and not ever once seeing a beggar. You may on occasion find a beggar selling packets of tissues outside a food centre, but if I was you, I wouldn’t even entertain it. Begging is illegal and can lead to a hefty fine.  

Punishment: S$3,000 fine or imprisonment for up to 2 years in prison. 

4. Not flushing the toilet is illegal in Singapore  

This would seem a pretty obvious thing to do, but some people don’t have house training! Singapore has quite rightly made this illegal. Officials are known to conduct random checks in public toilets to make sure people flush after they go. So please flush after yourself. I would say to avoid a fine I would suggest flushing after you go.  

Punishment: S$150 – S$500 fine 

5. Walking naked in your house is illegal 

Walking around your house naked is considered a form of pornography. And while you’re here, you should also know that pornography is also prohibited in Singapore. Don’t walk around naked in your home.  

Why? Well because it may cause a disturbance to your neighbours and you might receive an unexpected fine.  

Punishment: S$2,000 fine or up to 3 months in prison 

6. Don’t do drugs especially in Singapore  

Many countries ban drugs, but Singapore has much stricter sentencing for those that are caught trafficking or in possession of drugs could receive a hefty fine and or death penalty.  

You may think you can’t get caught but think again. Singapore officials can conduct anonymous and random drug tests to anyone without a warrant, and if you’re caught with drugs in your system, then you could be looking at a penalty. These included drugs taking before you enter Singapore so be mindful when travelling other parts of Asia.

Punishment: S$20,000 fines, up to 10 years in prison or the death penalty 

7.No Eating and drinking on public transport  

Durian
Durian

And the final law that I have to offer you today. Please do not eat or drink on any form of public transport this includes the MRT the bus anything! I remember when my friend told me about being fined when she was caught eating ice cream on the MRT! There are lots of food centres eat there or within closed doors. Oh and Durian a special fruit is also banned on public transport – don’t do it!

Punishment: S$5,000 fine  

Despite all the laws that exist in Singapore, it is actually one of my favourite Asian countries to visit and live. I think if I can live in Singapore for 7 months and not face a fine then you will also be fine.

What about you do you know any of any fines that exist in Singapore or around the world? Share in the comments below!  

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Black History Month: 10 Black Bloggers Making Modern Black History

Happy Black History Month!

I have never felt so compelled to be part or take notice of Black History Month until my unfortunate ordeal in Greece this year. Read the post – Arrested At The Acropolis: What Really Happened

It saddened me that people can see colour and not take time to actually see us for our truth and how amazing we are in the world. As black people, our history is raw, and it’s worth celebrating.

As black people, I don’t think we are celebrated enough, and as Black Bloggers, we are often left unnoticed. I wanted to use my platform today and showcase several black bloggers for Black History Month. Please read below the amazing black bloggers that are impacting our community!

Sarah Toyin

Black History Month is such a great time to celebrate the people that have made an impact in the black community but also remember what others have done to pave the way for us today! 

Sarah Toyin

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

As a black blogger, I would not really say I have faced any challenges perse directly. due to being a black blogger so I have nothing to contribute here. 

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

As a travel blogger at www.sarahtoyin.com. I provide information on teaching English in Korea, solo travel advice, general travel tips and guides as well as accommodation reviews and tips. Blogging has challenged me and helped me grow as an individual because I  am here to serve and help people with their travels.

It is not actually about me but how I can make others lives easier through the information I am providing. This has allowed me to think of others more than myself and that is how I have grown as an individual through blogging.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?  

This is an interesting question,  perhaps blog about it more, putting on events to celebrate it. and collaborations like this. As much as I love that there is a month for black history, I would really love for us to celebrate the history we have all year round.

YasminTells

I know its cheesy to say but every month is Black History month to me. I make a conscious effort to support black owed businesses whenever I can, all year round.

Yasmin Tells

I’m a travel blogger who focuses on travel in West Africa in particular. I relocated from the UK to the country of my origin Sierra Leone 10 months ago and I use the platform to share information and tips on Sierra Leone. I also used to work in Senegal so I have some information on there alongside other neighbouring countries such as my trip to Ghana last month for the Chale Wote Festival.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

As its new industry, I find myself cultivating and trying to understand it like many bloggers. I haven’t faced any challenges as of yet if I’m completely honest. However, I am aware of cases of black bloggers being paid less in the industry. But tell me something new!

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

I think it has in many ways subconsciously affected my thought processes, for example, I pay attention to detail more than I used to. That could be because I’m a content creator, I think more about the why, the outcome and the experience. I do believe all of these factors come from the art of storytelling also known today as blogging.

Mellissa The Island Girl

Black history month is about celebrating all that’s black. It’s about black people also educating themselves about their past- not slavery but all the great ways that we have contributed to the advancement of the human race. It is a month to remember how great we are both women and men. If we unite, we can be even greater. It is a time to rediscover the love that we should have for our melanin. We are a beautiful group of varied people. We are creative, we are strong, and we are resilient. 

Melissa The Island Girl

I’m a travel, fashion and lifestyle blogger/content creator. You can find me at www.theislandgirl.co.uk.  

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

 My blog has made me braver. I’m more fearless and I’m learning to not worry about what others may think of me or what I am doing. I have attended events alone and have met some wonderful people. I’ve connected with people on Instagram and Twitter. I have become more expressive. Through content creation, I am exposed to different mediums of capturing moments. Most importantly my blog is helping me to discover me. I am definitely learning about myself-all the things I am capable of doing and all the inner boundaries I am able to push. 

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

To be honest, just like this. Highlighting how much of us there are in these creative spaces and giving us a voice and a platform to be seen and heard. Thank you for sharing this brilliant idea of featuring other black bloggers! 

JennasWorldView

Our history is too rich, royal and powerful to be condensed in one month. I make it a point to celebrate my blackness everyday. However I do appreciate that our history does have its own space on the calendar. But we shouldn’t wait until October (UK) & February(US) to celebrate our greatness. Its an everyday thing.

Jennas World View

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

Blogging has stretched me. It’s been my personal therapy that has helped me understand so much about myself and my journey of womanhood and blackness. Being able to use my personal experiences for content has allowed me to reflect on a deeper level. In addition to that running a self-hosted blog has taught me lots of new transferable skills. I’m constantly learning.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

I think that the black blogging community shouldn’t shy away from creating content that showcases our community. The power in our creative minds is next level phenomenal. We have the ability to bring our stories, views, experiences, current news to life. We should always aim to control the narrative and not be afraid to create content that promotes, edifies and educates those within our community. Nobody knows our stories better than we do. Black history month is the best time for all of us to contribute.

Cynthia Clarke

Black History month is an opportunity to “showcase”.  There are so many Black people who have done and are doing phenomenal things and we often don’t get to hear about that unless someone is being “showcased”.  It’s a time to celebrate how special we are, how talented we are, how resilient we are, how smart we are, and how beautiful we are! 

Cynthia Clarke

During my travels, I see and meet a lot of people but I don’t see as many black people as I would like, especially if I’m travelling somewhere other than the Caribbean. With Sojourner Moxie, I’m seeking to change that narrative by providing travel tips, destination travel guides, step by step instructions on how to start travelling, inspiration, and showcasing out of the box adventures. It’s a big world out there…let’s go check it out!  Another issue some Black women may face in regards to travel is finding someone to travel with.  Through my travels, I‘m showing them it’s ok to travel solo.  www.sojournermoxie.com

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

Good question! As a blogger, you are always reading other blogs, and if you’re not careful the tendency to compare yourself to others will hinder your progress.  My blogging journey has solidified my sense of self and what I have to offer.  The woman who is in her 40s and above, the woman who is now an empty nester, the woman who’s been married for decades and is now divorced…that’s my audience!  That’s who I want to reach.  I have to be authentic to do that.  Every day, I’m determined to be true to that.  That’s continual growth.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

I like what you’re doing!  Bringing Black voices together and showing the length and breadth of what we bring to the table.  I’m even thinking of doing something like this in the travel space.  Every blogger wants to be successful, but Black History Month is a great time to say look at my sister, look at my brother…see what they’re doing…they’re changing the game and it’s a beautiful thing!!!

Gabby Beckford

In three words, I would say pride, representation, and hope. Black bloggers need more visibility than ever these days, and representation absolutely matters. We are no longer fighting for tolerance, we are fighting for acceptance and celebration. Black History Month is an opportunity to show the world that yes, we’re still here thriving, working, and succeeding! Many of us! In abundance! And that is powerful.

Gabby Beckford

I am a travel and lifestyle blogger—the main functions of my platform at the moment are writing helpful and entertaining travel articles and sharing funded travel opportunities I call Packs Light Travel Opps. These opportunities are travel grants for international experiences such as conferences, fellowships, study abroad, internships, and more. I won more than $69,000 in scholarships in college much of which helped me travel, so it’s a passion of mine to advocate and share this resource with my followers! You can find me on all social media platforms as @packslight, and on my blog at www.packslight.com.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

One of the biggest issues facing black bloggers is to pay discrepancies. Brands will pay other (often white or lighter-skinned) influencer considerably more than me when we are working the same campaign at the same time. I’m happy that most of the time, other influencers are open to sharing how much they are making so I can know about the unfair pay and address it. There have been times I worked pro-bono for a large company when they said they didn’t have a budget just to find out another non-Black influencer was paid. It’s ridiculous, unfair, and unendingly frustrating.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

Blogging has definitely transformed my mind into one of business. I see a system for every action, a collaboration with every meeting, and a window for every closed door. Networking is fun for me now! Blogging specifically about travel has also made me so much more appreciative of my life and aware of my privilege. I love to travel, and I love to encourage other people to travel. Sometimes it’s not that simple, and blogging has been an invaluable tool in my reflection and growth over the past 6 years.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

Lifting each other up is the best way. Taking this month as an opportunity to promote other Black bloggers and creatives, cross-pollenate the black-blogger-love between your followers and watch the magic that happens! By sharing others, they share you. And also, writing about it. Talking about it. Showing our followers that we do care about Black History Month, it matters in 2019, and we need to take note of it and it’s the true meaning of community!

Saabirah Lawrence

Black History Month for me is a time to remember the individuals that have paved the way for us as a community today. It’s also a great time to discover and celebrate the individuals that are doing great things for the black community right now.

Saabirah Lawrence

When I started out I pretty much wrote about anything and everything, from makeup to social issues and at the time it made sense as I have many interests. Now I only focus on a few topics: wellness, empowerment, lifestyle and natural hair. I try to keep my content within those topics but I have found that I really enjoy sharing my blogging experience and any advice for other bloggers. 

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

I think my biggest challenge is finding brands/companies that I actually want to work with. As a black blogger, I find my go-to when it comes to brand collaborations is black-owned businesses. This obviously isn’t a bad thing, sometimes It just means the budget for work is smaller but If I see the vision I am totally on board. I just find it hard to know where I stand as a black woman with a lot of major brands. It’s a big turn off for me to see brands throwing the words ”diverse” and ”inclusive” into their campaigns when really it is all just surface level. there is no real work being done to challenge the industry’s views on working with black bloggers.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

As I started writing about wellness, it has really made me become more self-aware and open to bettering myself. Mostly for me but I also think having a better understanding of myself and more confidence will make me a better writer. Blogging has definitely helped me find my voice, explore my creative side and meet some amazing people.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

I think the black blogging community has been a useful source of information during black history month. It’s important to use this time of the month to highlight what is happening during black history month (events, films, new product/service launches, workshops, popups, etc), highlight some important and inspiring black figures and has conversations that need to be had within the community.

Debbie Adigun

When I think of Black History Month, I think about what I learnt about black history in school. Slavery. That’s all we learnt as if that is all Black history is.

So, for me, Black History Month is a reminder that we need to educate ourselves about our history. Although it shouldn’t be restricted this month alone, this is a time to celebrate our black heroes, look back on how far we’ve come and reflected on how we can do better in the future.

WanderlustCalls

I am a Travel and Lifestyle Blogger who achieved my goal to visit 25 countries before I turned 25. I use my blog to try to help and inspire people to step out of their comfort zones and to travel more. Like many, I love to experience a little luxury without breaking the bank, so I share tips on how to do bougie travel on a budget.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

One challenge that I have faced as a black blogger is turning up to events and being the only black person in the room. It’s not even an exaggeration when I say that sometimes I’ve been in a room and felt unwelcomed by others in the room. I literally felt like an outcast. There are so many talented black bloggers, so seeing events like this really frustrates me. 

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

I’m extremely shy and blogging has really forced me out of my comfort zone. If you told a younger Debbie that I would one day put myself out there both online and off, I would never have believed it. But here, I am doing that on a regular basis. Even though I am still mad shy, it makes me realise how far I have come.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?

I think that black bloggers can use their platforms to share a different narrative to the one that we are bombarded with by the media. We can share black stories, uplift black people and collaborate with other black bloggers and businesses. This shouldn’t just be restricted to Black History Month. This should be a regular thing.

Jess Anyan-Brown


Black History Month is a great time to reflect on all the great things black people have done to contribute to the UK and just in general! The list is endless! I remember being in primary school and it was a time when we had posters around the school and put on events during assembly for this and this was special as 90% of the school at the time were black. However, I feel that it should all just be taught and thought about all year round (not just one month) and I hope to see this happen one day. 

Jess


I blog about travel and culture my website – www.roadtoculturedom.com  because I believe that you can find culture wherever you travel to (domestically or internationally) and I want to inspire others to do so through my experiences.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

I feel like the challenges faced as a black blogger for me started with the lack of representation in mainstream travel spaces. When I started my journey, I had to search hard to find this and it gives the impression that you’ll have to work extra hard to have the same chance. This has changed as I got to know the black travel community more and connect with incredible bloggers both in the UK and abroad. I love how we are actively trying to change the diversity of travel and creating our own tables!

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?  

The black blogging community is doing well to bring Black History Month through social media, events etc. It is not just to other blacks people but everyone else who is interested and wants to understand the black culture more. I feel like once we start making black history month something that is celebrated all year round. This will do wonders to change how the Western World perceives black history. Social media is very powerful so anything is possible. 

DiyWithJoy

Black history month is empowering to me. But it means so much more than celebrating for a month. It means every day I can unapologetically celebrate my beautiful melanated whole self, black people around me and the historical black people before me who paved the way so I have a voice, a voice of freedom.

DiyWithJoy

As a travel, food and lifestyle blogger on www.diywithjoy.com, I create content to inspire and encourage a community to find more joy in travelling and cooking, life & wellbeing. I love creating delicious and nutritious recipes inspired by travelling as I explore different palates and flavours globally. I share tips on how to #travelsmart, solo travel tips to inspire more people, especially women to take the first step to travel solo, travel stories and advice while having an enriching experience and discovering the beauty of the world through my lens. You can catch up with the Diywithjoy platform on TwitterInstagram and Facebook.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

I feel that one of the challenges I have faced as a black blogger is that not everyone will like the content that you produce and that’s okay. This year I have really found my niche, my tribe and growing community in the blogging world and they have helped me understand what my audience would like to see more of from me.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

My blogging journey has helped me grow immensely in many ways as an individual. It has helped me strengthen my writing skills. Before blogging, I used to think I wasn’t much of a writer and more or a mathematician as I’m an engineer. I used to say to myself that I was better with numbers than words. Blogging has aided my cultivation for content writing and now I can boldly say to myself that I’m a great writer. Blogging has helped me become more organised, disciplined and accountable. It has also given me the courage to launch my travel business and has helped develop my confidence to put myself out there and network with other people which I am really grateful for.     

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?  

The black blogging community is really powerful and I think we can contribute more to Black history month but continuing to support one another, share more opportunities with each other and raise more awareness on why black history month is important and why it should be championed. 

And with that, I would like to say…

Happy Nigerian Independence Day

I hope you enjoyed reading about these amazing women and their journeys. Are your celebrating Black History Month? Check places to go – Read: 10 Black History Month Events to Attend in 2019

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AmeriKKKa | 90s Baby Show

I went to the Black Lives Matter March. For me it was fresh and on my mind – listen to me discuss the issues that are happening still in 2016! “It ain’t safe in AmeriKKKa, as matter of fact it ain’t safe in most places in the world for black people.

Why don’t we just go back to Africa where we are the majority and accepted?
Must be like or enjoy what’s happening to us right?

THEY keep saying All Lives Matter, but black ones clearly don’t. What people need to understand is Black Lives Matter is not created to make one race feel more superior than another. its actually a battle for equality.

In this episode we draw on some memorable speeches and interviews from the past and give our own take on things with Guest from here and America

How confused we are.
How annoyed we are.
How stressed we are.
How scared we are.

But we are sure God has a plan. Will non-violent protests help, will violent protests make things worse.

We pose the question: Riot or March? is it time to pick up a sign or pick up a Brick and launch it through the nearest shop window?

There has to be a light at the end of this racist tunnel. Making our lives better will not make THEIR lives worse”

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FOR NOW, IN MY OPINION, “SLAVERY HAS NEVER BEEN ABOLISHED”!.

Such a bold statement: yet once you have read my article and watched this powerful documentary, you will most likely share the same opinion. In the light of Black History Month and with the American (USA) elections approaching, I recently decided to take some time out and watch a documentary called 13th (only shown on Netflix as far as I am aware – do correct me if I am wrong). One thing I did learn immediately was that Slavery was and has never been abolished – yes in my opinion.

Carry on reading why I believe slavery is still alive.

Director Ava DuVernay produced the documentary called 13th. It challenges and even dismantles the collective idea that we as a world believe in the word “progress”.

How does one define progress?

The 13th amendment: “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States.”

What does this mean?

The definition above gives the assumption that American citizens are protected under the Constitution – yet when you watch this powerful documentary you begin to understand that really and truly, slavery was and has never been abolished in the USA! It has quite simply been amended to fit into the purpose of the people in charge of the so called free world.

A chilling fact is that the USA is home to 5% of the world’s population; yet 25% of the world’s prisoners are in the USA, with an even greater percentage either on probation or on parole! And guess what colour the vast majority of these prisoners, etc are? The percentage of black people, compared to their total population in the USA – men and the  poor in particular, who spend their lives in prison, on probation and on parole, was and is still horrendous. Simply put, the number and proportion of Black people imprisoned, on probation or on parole is higher than any other ethic group – even though Black people are less than 20% of the total population of the USA!  Some of the more damaging effects are that large numbers of households are headed by single women – resulting in even more children growing up without fathers or father-figures; thus creating the perfect storm for perpetuating more poverty, poor education, lack of upward social mobility and consequent future incineration and recidivism! To think that the numbers are continuously rising is extremely disturbing!

The Documentary

The documentary covers the inescapable and undeniable connections of the legal and political systems to the mass incarceration of black people. It goes far back to the time of slavery and up to where we are now – with civil rights for black people. While it’s fair to say that the system appear to have changed, with you begging to under the use of language like you learn that there hasn’t been any real change in that the essentials and spirit of the legal and political system are still very much the same – keeping black people as “criminals”, and in chains! Its only more complex now; but the historical examples of slavery are still happening today! You and I still live in an era of slavery!

13th goes deep into breaking it down as to why this still happens and what the benefits are to the community of captors. One word – and that is profit! Which is exactly what it was all about during the era of slavery. The present private prison system earns millions in profits for its shareholders, simply from the head count of prisoners. So, its in the interest of the managers, shareholders and other beneficiaries to lock up as many people as possible – be it Black, Hispanic or anyone else who doesn’t fit “the real American agenda! “

13th is not just a documentary, but a demand. It is demanding that we know what has happened and how much our world hasn’t changed. Like I said in my last article, black history month: what for? With the American election fast approaching (on Tuesday November 8, 2016), it doesn’t matter now who you vote for; the constitution and laws still stand!

Unfortunately, our history is still exactly the same, only now just a different use of language!

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