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Black History Month: Why More Black People Should Give Blood

At 17 years old I became a blood donor. I won’t lie and say I wasn’t a little nervous. I had never donated blood before, and the nurse at the time complained she couldn’t find a vein. After my session, I remember feeling like I had done something powerful. I was giving blood which could potentially help someone and save their life.  

It is estimated that only 1% of England’s population that give blood is black. More people are in need to give blood from all communities and ethnic backgrounds, particularly those from a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) community. 

What is Sickle Cell?   

Sickle cell disease is a group of disorders that affects hemoglobin, the molecule in red blood cells that delivers oxygen to cells throughout the body. People with this disorder have atypical hemoglobin molecules called hemoglobin S, which can distort red blood cells into a sickle, or crescent, shape. 

What is Thalassaemia:

Thalassemia is a genetic blood disorder. People with Thalassemia disease are not able to make enough hemoglobin, which causes severe anemia. Haemoglobin is found in red blood cells and carries oxygen to all parts of the body. … Beta Thalassemia Major (also called Cooley’s Anemia) is a severe illness. 

Thalassaemia and Sickle Cell disease is blood conditions that most commonly affect people within the black, Asian and minority ethnic communities. The treatment of this condition is more successful using blood that is very closely matched to the patients. 

Why are more BAME donors needed? 

  1. Many patients receive frequent blood transfusions which require a much close match to their type of blood. 
  2. Many blood conditions, such as Sickle Cell or Thalassaemia, are usually treated by blood transfusions, most commonly affected in BAME communities.
  3. It is also noted that the best match typically comes from blood donors from the same ethnic background.

6 Reasons Why You Should be a Blood Donor As A Black Person:

While people from all communities and backgrounds do donate blood. There was still only an estimate of less than 5% of our blood donors that gave blood, which in the last year were from black, Asian and minority ethnic communities. I can imagine you can share reasons on why more people should donate blood, particularly black people, but for now, here are a few below.  

You will be saving someone’s life by giving your blood.  

This is true. According to GiveBloodNHS, it is estimated that 1,000 people in the UK have thalassaemia, and between 13,000-15,000 people in the UK have sickle cell disease.

Blood transfusions are in need, and if you can give blood and save a life. Why not? If you become a blood donor, you will be changing someone’s life.

Every blood donation can save or improve the lives of up to three adults or six, sometimes children.  

There are different blood groups  

There are different blood types, nearly more than 30 different types of blood groups.  During National Blood Week in June this year the letters A, O and B had dropped significantly. 

However, there are blood groups which are particularly vulnerable to shortfall such as O negative. It’s important to note that all patients can receive this blood in an emergency.

It’s for a charitable cause to give blood

Remember my little story where I gave blood at 17 years old? When I gave blood, I had a view that if I gave blood I would be making a difference.

Back then, I hated the idea of giving money to a charity. I had and still have several reasons why, but it mainly involved me not knowing where my money was going. I believed by giving blood I was genuinely making a difference.  

BAME DONORS ARE NEEDED 

It goes back to what I was saying earlier, BAME donors are significantly needed! Conditions such as sickle cell and thalassemia are also more likely to affect these communities with patients requiring regular blood transfusions ideally from donors from a similar ethnic background.  

It’s not as difficult as it sounds  

Although my first experience wasn’t the smoothest, I can honestly say after that it has been pretty straight forward. Giving blood can be quite straight forward if you want it to be. You can book an appointment online and can be in and out in less than half an hour.  

Black Travel Creators are collaborating with NHSGiveBlood for Black History Month

You may already know that October is Black History Month in the UK, so Black Travel Creators have decided to work with Give Blood NHS, to encourage more black people to give blood. We already have a date set for the 27th of October. This is for 15 blood donors, were we hope to encourage more black people to come on the day and give blood.

It doesn’t stop there! We hope to also raise awareness and encourage black people all over the world to register as a blood donor. ✈?

Interested? Then Register your details (if you haven’t already) and email your donor number to – blacktravelcreators@outlook.com We will then send more details for timings etc.

I have a few Black History Month Posts for Reading:

Black History Month: 10 Black Bloggers Making Modern Black History

10 Black History Month Events to Attend in 2019

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Black History Month: 10 Black Bloggers Making Modern Black History

Happy Black History Month!

I have never felt so compelled to be part or take notice of Black History Month until my unfortunate ordeal in Greece this year. Read the post – Arrested At The Acropolis: What Really Happened

It saddened me that people can see colour and not take time to actually see us for our truth and how amazing we are in the world. As black people, our history is raw, and it’s worth celebrating.

As black people, I don’t think we are celebrated enough, and as Black Bloggers, we are often left unnoticed. I wanted to use my platform today and showcase several black bloggers for Black History Month. Please read below the amazing black bloggers that are impacting our community!

Sarah Toyin

Black History Month is such a great time to celebrate the people that have made an impact in the black community but also remember what others have done to pave the way for us today! 

Sarah Toyin

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

As a black blogger, I would not really say I have faced any challenges perse directly. due to being a black blogger so I have nothing to contribute here. 

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

As a travel blogger at www.sarahtoyin.com. I provide information on teaching English in Korea, solo travel advice, general travel tips and guides as well as accommodation reviews and tips. Blogging has challenged me and helped me grow as an individual because I  am here to serve and help people with their travels.

It is not actually about me but how I can make others lives easier through the information I am providing. This has allowed me to think of others more than myself and that is how I have grown as an individual through blogging.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?  

This is an interesting question,  perhaps blog about it more, putting on events to celebrate it. and collaborations like this. As much as I love that there is a month for black history, I would really love for us to celebrate the history we have all year round.

YasminTells

I know its cheesy to say but every month is Black History month to me. I make a conscious effort to support black owed businesses whenever I can, all year round.

Yasmin Tells

I’m a travel blogger who focuses on travel in West Africa in particular. I relocated from the UK to the country of my origin Sierra Leone 10 months ago and I use the platform to share information and tips on Sierra Leone. I also used to work in Senegal so I have some information on there alongside other neighbouring countries such as my trip to Ghana last month for the Chale Wote Festival.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

As its new industry, I find myself cultivating and trying to understand it like many bloggers. I haven’t faced any challenges as of yet if I’m completely honest. However, I am aware of cases of black bloggers being paid less in the industry. But tell me something new!

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

I think it has in many ways subconsciously affected my thought processes, for example, I pay attention to detail more than I used to. That could be because I’m a content creator, I think more about the why, the outcome and the experience. I do believe all of these factors come from the art of storytelling also known today as blogging.

Mellissa The Island Girl

Black history month is about celebrating all that’s black. It’s about black people also educating themselves about their past- not slavery but all the great ways that we have contributed to the advancement of the human race. It is a month to remember how great we are both women and men. If we unite, we can be even greater. It is a time to rediscover the love that we should have for our melanin. We are a beautiful group of varied people. We are creative, we are strong, and we are resilient. 

Melissa The Island Girl

I’m a travel, fashion and lifestyle blogger/content creator. You can find me at www.theislandgirl.co.uk.  

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

 My blog has made me braver. I’m more fearless and I’m learning to not worry about what others may think of me or what I am doing. I have attended events alone and have met some wonderful people. I’ve connected with people on Instagram and Twitter. I have become more expressive. Through content creation, I am exposed to different mediums of capturing moments. Most importantly my blog is helping me to discover me. I am definitely learning about myself-all the things I am capable of doing and all the inner boundaries I am able to push. 

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

To be honest, just like this. Highlighting how much of us there are in these creative spaces and giving us a voice and a platform to be seen and heard. Thank you for sharing this brilliant idea of featuring other black bloggers! 

JennasWorldView

Our history is too rich, royal and powerful to be condensed in one month. I make it a point to celebrate my blackness everyday. However I do appreciate that our history does have its own space on the calendar. But we shouldn’t wait until October (UK) & February(US) to celebrate our greatness. Its an everyday thing.

Jennas World View

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

Blogging has stretched me. It’s been my personal therapy that has helped me understand so much about myself and my journey of womanhood and blackness. Being able to use my personal experiences for content has allowed me to reflect on a deeper level. In addition to that running a self-hosted blog has taught me lots of new transferable skills. I’m constantly learning.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

I think that the black blogging community shouldn’t shy away from creating content that showcases our community. The power in our creative minds is next level phenomenal. We have the ability to bring our stories, views, experiences, current news to life. We should always aim to control the narrative and not be afraid to create content that promotes, edifies and educates those within our community. Nobody knows our stories better than we do. Black history month is the best time for all of us to contribute.

Cynthia Clarke

Black History month is an opportunity to “showcase”.  There are so many Black people who have done and are doing phenomenal things and we often don’t get to hear about that unless someone is being “showcased”.  It’s a time to celebrate how special we are, how talented we are, how resilient we are, how smart we are, and how beautiful we are! 

Cynthia Clarke

During my travels, I see and meet a lot of people but I don’t see as many black people as I would like, especially if I’m travelling somewhere other than the Caribbean. With Sojourner Moxie, I’m seeking to change that narrative by providing travel tips, destination travel guides, step by step instructions on how to start travelling, inspiration, and showcasing out of the box adventures. It’s a big world out there…let’s go check it out!  Another issue some Black women may face in regards to travel is finding someone to travel with.  Through my travels, I‘m showing them it’s ok to travel solo.  www.sojournermoxie.com

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

Good question! As a blogger, you are always reading other blogs, and if you’re not careful the tendency to compare yourself to others will hinder your progress.  My blogging journey has solidified my sense of self and what I have to offer.  The woman who is in her 40s and above, the woman who is now an empty nester, the woman who’s been married for decades and is now divorced…that’s my audience!  That’s who I want to reach.  I have to be authentic to do that.  Every day, I’m determined to be true to that.  That’s continual growth.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

I like what you’re doing!  Bringing Black voices together and showing the length and breadth of what we bring to the table.  I’m even thinking of doing something like this in the travel space.  Every blogger wants to be successful, but Black History Month is a great time to say look at my sister, look at my brother…see what they’re doing…they’re changing the game and it’s a beautiful thing!!!

Gabby Beckford

In three words, I would say pride, representation, and hope. Black bloggers need more visibility than ever these days, and representation absolutely matters. We are no longer fighting for tolerance, we are fighting for acceptance and celebration. Black History Month is an opportunity to show the world that yes, we’re still here thriving, working, and succeeding! Many of us! In abundance! And that is powerful.

Gabby Beckford

I am a travel and lifestyle blogger—the main functions of my platform at the moment are writing helpful and entertaining travel articles and sharing funded travel opportunities I call Packs Light Travel Opps. These opportunities are travel grants for international experiences such as conferences, fellowships, study abroad, internships, and more. I won more than $69,000 in scholarships in college much of which helped me travel, so it’s a passion of mine to advocate and share this resource with my followers! You can find me on all social media platforms as @packslight, and on my blog at www.packslight.com.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

One of the biggest issues facing black bloggers is to pay discrepancies. Brands will pay other (often white or lighter-skinned) influencer considerably more than me when we are working the same campaign at the same time. I’m happy that most of the time, other influencers are open to sharing how much they are making so I can know about the unfair pay and address it. There have been times I worked pro-bono for a large company when they said they didn’t have a budget just to find out another non-Black influencer was paid. It’s ridiculous, unfair, and unendingly frustrating.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

Blogging has definitely transformed my mind into one of business. I see a system for every action, a collaboration with every meeting, and a window for every closed door. Networking is fun for me now! Blogging specifically about travel has also made me so much more appreciative of my life and aware of my privilege. I love to travel, and I love to encourage other people to travel. Sometimes it’s not that simple, and blogging has been an invaluable tool in my reflection and growth over the past 6 years.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

Lifting each other up is the best way. Taking this month as an opportunity to promote other Black bloggers and creatives, cross-pollenate the black-blogger-love between your followers and watch the magic that happens! By sharing others, they share you. And also, writing about it. Talking about it. Showing our followers that we do care about Black History Month, it matters in 2019, and we need to take note of it and it’s the true meaning of community!

Saabirah Lawrence

Black History Month for me is a time to remember the individuals that have paved the way for us as a community today. It’s also a great time to discover and celebrate the individuals that are doing great things for the black community right now.

Saabirah Lawrence

When I started out I pretty much wrote about anything and everything, from makeup to social issues and at the time it made sense as I have many interests. Now I only focus on a few topics: wellness, empowerment, lifestyle and natural hair. I try to keep my content within those topics but I have found that I really enjoy sharing my blogging experience and any advice for other bloggers. 

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

I think my biggest challenge is finding brands/companies that I actually want to work with. As a black blogger, I find my go-to when it comes to brand collaborations is black-owned businesses. This obviously isn’t a bad thing, sometimes It just means the budget for work is smaller but If I see the vision I am totally on board. I just find it hard to know where I stand as a black woman with a lot of major brands. It’s a big turn off for me to see brands throwing the words ”diverse” and ”inclusive” into their campaigns when really it is all just surface level. there is no real work being done to challenge the industry’s views on working with black bloggers.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

As I started writing about wellness, it has really made me become more self-aware and open to bettering myself. Mostly for me but I also think having a better understanding of myself and more confidence will make me a better writer. Blogging has definitely helped me find my voice, explore my creative side and meet some amazing people.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

I think the black blogging community has been a useful source of information during black history month. It’s important to use this time of the month to highlight what is happening during black history month (events, films, new product/service launches, workshops, popups, etc), highlight some important and inspiring black figures and has conversations that need to be had within the community.

Debbie Adigun

When I think of Black History Month, I think about what I learnt about black history in school. Slavery. That’s all we learnt as if that is all Black history is.

So, for me, Black History Month is a reminder that we need to educate ourselves about our history. Although it shouldn’t be restricted this month alone, this is a time to celebrate our black heroes, look back on how far we’ve come and reflected on how we can do better in the future.

WanderlustCalls

I am a Travel and Lifestyle Blogger who achieved my goal to visit 25 countries before I turned 25. I use my blog to try to help and inspire people to step out of their comfort zones and to travel more. Like many, I love to experience a little luxury without breaking the bank, so I share tips on how to do bougie travel on a budget.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

One challenge that I have faced as a black blogger is turning up to events and being the only black person in the room. It’s not even an exaggeration when I say that sometimes I’ve been in a room and felt unwelcomed by others in the room. I literally felt like an outcast. There are so many talented black bloggers, so seeing events like this really frustrates me. 

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

I’m extremely shy and blogging has really forced me out of my comfort zone. If you told a younger Debbie that I would one day put myself out there both online and off, I would never have believed it. But here, I am doing that on a regular basis. Even though I am still mad shy, it makes me realise how far I have come.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?

I think that black bloggers can use their platforms to share a different narrative to the one that we are bombarded with by the media. We can share black stories, uplift black people and collaborate with other black bloggers and businesses. This shouldn’t just be restricted to Black History Month. This should be a regular thing.

Jess Anyan-Brown


Black History Month is a great time to reflect on all the great things black people have done to contribute to the UK and just in general! The list is endless! I remember being in primary school and it was a time when we had posters around the school and put on events during assembly for this and this was special as 90% of the school at the time were black. However, I feel that it should all just be taught and thought about all year round (not just one month) and I hope to see this happen one day. 

Jess


I blog about travel and culture my website – www.roadtoculturedom.com  because I believe that you can find culture wherever you travel to (domestically or internationally) and I want to inspire others to do so through my experiences.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

I feel like the challenges faced as a black blogger for me started with the lack of representation in mainstream travel spaces. When I started my journey, I had to search hard to find this and it gives the impression that you’ll have to work extra hard to have the same chance. This has changed as I got to know the black travel community more and connect with incredible bloggers both in the UK and abroad. I love how we are actively trying to change the diversity of travel and creating our own tables!

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?  

The black blogging community is doing well to bring Black History Month through social media, events etc. It is not just to other blacks people but everyone else who is interested and wants to understand the black culture more. I feel like once we start making black history month something that is celebrated all year round. This will do wonders to change how the Western World perceives black history. Social media is very powerful so anything is possible. 

DiyWithJoy

Black history month is empowering to me. But it means so much more than celebrating for a month. It means every day I can unapologetically celebrate my beautiful melanated whole self, black people around me and the historical black people before me who paved the way so I have a voice, a voice of freedom.

DiyWithJoy

As a travel, food and lifestyle blogger on www.diywithjoy.com, I create content to inspire and encourage a community to find more joy in travelling and cooking, life & wellbeing. I love creating delicious and nutritious recipes inspired by travelling as I explore different palates and flavours globally. I share tips on how to #travelsmart, solo travel tips to inspire more people, especially women to take the first step to travel solo, travel stories and advice while having an enriching experience and discovering the beauty of the world through my lens. You can catch up with the Diywithjoy platform on TwitterInstagram and Facebook.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

I feel that one of the challenges I have faced as a black blogger is that not everyone will like the content that you produce and that’s okay. This year I have really found my niche, my tribe and growing community in the blogging world and they have helped me understand what my audience would like to see more of from me.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

My blogging journey has helped me grow immensely in many ways as an individual. It has helped me strengthen my writing skills. Before blogging, I used to think I wasn’t much of a writer and more or a mathematician as I’m an engineer. I used to say to myself that I was better with numbers than words. Blogging has aided my cultivation for content writing and now I can boldly say to myself that I’m a great writer. Blogging has helped me become more organised, disciplined and accountable. It has also given me the courage to launch my travel business and has helped develop my confidence to put myself out there and network with other people which I am really grateful for.     

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?  

The black blogging community is really powerful and I think we can contribute more to Black history month but continuing to support one another, share more opportunities with each other and raise more awareness on why black history month is important and why it should be championed. 

And with that, I would like to say…

Happy Nigerian Independence Day

I hope you enjoyed reading about these amazing women and their journeys. Are your celebrating Black History Month? Check places to go – Read: 10 Black History Month Events to Attend in 2019

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Things You Should Know If You’re Wrongfully Arrested Abroad

Going on a holiday usually involves a nice getaway for a few days of work. For me at least. It usually means I experience a view of a city or spend some time by the sea. Travelling for me is not only my form of escape but a time to educate and refresh myself for my return home. It never ever involves being arrested for a false accusation.

On the 1st of August, I was invited by my boyfriend to meet his parents. In the trip, I knew I wanted to see the sites of Athens. What I experienced still till this day has left me humiliated and traumatised. How things can be massively exaggerated and blow out of proportion is beyond understanding. If you are yet to read the full story please read the full story – Arrested at the Acropolis: What Really Happened. 

There is guidance already on what one should do if arrested in a foreign country. After the ordeal of what I went through, I would suggest every single person that travels to read them. They can be found on this link – Help if you’re arrested abroad 

Protect yourself if you are arrested:

In all the countries I have been I have never ever been arrested! I feel it’s essential to know the following things below:

  • Know the number of the British Embassy for the country you are travelling too
  • Do not sign anything unless you fully understand what is being asked.
  • Contact your local embassy immediately
  • Request for a lawyer and a translator
  • Always have some form of identification with you on your person
  • Never argue with the local authorities
  • Tell the truth
  • Importantly stay calm and comply with the authorities

Looking back at the incident now, I don’t know how this could have been avoided. It could have happened anywhere and to anyone, but it occurred to me in Greece Athens, a country notoriously known for racism.

The Golden Dawn was a party that sat in the Greek parliament; and one of most far-right parties in Europe. While the party itself rejects the fascist label, it nonetheless espouses all core fascist- and more specifically Nazi- principles.

Five things you should be aware if you are ever arrested in a foreign country.

You can call the British Embassy

The first thing to do if you can is to ring the local British Embassy. There is an emergency contact number which you can also contact if the local embassy is closed. Unfortunately, I was unable to get through to the embassy at the time. One, I was hysterical and two my phone wasn’t allowing me to make calls.

When you do speak with the embassy, be sure to explain to them what happened clearly. They will advise you on what next to do, make them aware of where you are currently. The embassy can also arrange for friends and family to be informed. So be sure to identify someone you deeply trust.

Do not argue with the authorities (comply)

Comply with whatever the authorities ask you to do (within reason). This can be difficult if there is a language barrier. Do not sign anything you do not understand.

I was able to know what I needed to do next through signals. If they make signals for you to move or they are pushing you out of a site. I would advise you to comply and not argue.

Ask for a Translator 

According to the Acropolis, Police Station was convinced that they couldn’t provide me with any legal advice or a lawyer. This made me extremely uncomfortable, but there wasn’t much I could do at the time. I was very fortunate that my boyfriend agreed to translate the statement. If you can get a professional please do so.

Ask for Legal Support  

As a British Citizen, if arrested, you’re entitled to a lawyer and a translator. I, unfortunately, didn’t to receive any of these benefits until I was presented at court. Once you have contacted the British Embassy, they should be able to consult with what you should do next.

Remain calm  

This has to be the most important advice I can give you. You won’t really know or understand what is going on. In such an ordeal, many people will be telling you different bits of information. Try and remain calm in shock, you won’t understand what is going on.

If possible, try and remain calm because it can be terrifying. It was most certainly the scariest thing I have ever experienced in my life. Moreover, I hope and pray that I never go through such an incident again. What helped me the most was having the love and support from you all. It really assured me that your prayers would be rightfully answered.

If you know you have done nothing wrong, then you have no reason to be at fault. I was able to speak the truth and immediately acquitted.

Thank you for taking the time to share, read and show your continued support. You may already know that I have now opened my blog to share other stories of discrimination while travelling. If you would like your account to be shared, please follow the link – Have you ever experienced discrimination?

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Don’t TOUCH, Ask Q’s About MY HAIR

This is for the beautiful amazing black QUEENS out there in the corporate world that just want a new fresh hairstyle, but threat on how to deal with “those comments and questions” read more you will understand….

Warning you may want to apply a slight American dialect to this but I think regardless we all will appreciate!

Girls, girls, girllllls! I write this as I listen to Solonge – Don’t touch my hair! which I know y’all have listened too and can relate! If you haven’t then girlllll you better get on it! She speaks about our crown that they (you know who… and if you don’t you will) shouldn’t touch. I can’t tell you how sick, tired, annoyed but also slightly amused of feeling uncomfortable about doing my hair in different styles simply because of the working environment, my work colleagues in the past and present have put me in. I know, I know why should I care?! I shouldn’t but it’s hard when you go to work with that fresh new weave or those fresh new braids, or coinrows were you’re of course feeling yourself as you should; then you have someone ask you.


“Your hair looks nice, how do they make it like that”

“It’s very interesting how they make your hair like that”

“Do you wash your hair when it’s in the weave”

“Your hair looks like you have snakes on your head”

“How long do you have to sit still for … ohhh no I couldn’t do that”

“Do you think they could do my hair like that I have…..

LOOK listen let me just stop you right there!

YES! These statements and questions can get annoying!


Let me tell you my most recent story….

I went to work with a curly wig (I made it myself so I was quite pleased) picture below so you get the idea. People at work (you know what sort of people I am talking about). Yes non-black people told me my hair was nice and all that ish; I appreciated it, but then someone had the cheek to then turn around and tell me my hair looked springy! Like what does he mean SPRINGY??

LIKE girlssss you know when a black person says your hair looks nice there’s a difference to when a non-black person says your hair looks nice. They wanna know more! They wanna follow it up with a detailed explanation on how your hair magically got like that! Like Please!

That type of shit be getting on my nerves!

When this person allowed his mouth to open and tell me my hair looked springy! At that very moment I just wanted to have an Issa moment, you know where I rap and drop a base on how curly hair ain’t springy! (I would write the lyrics but I stink at rap!) Instead I politely smiled and let that one slide. No one wants an angry black woman in the office right?

Anyways, anyways let’s face it I could be here all day telling you what stupid, ignorant statements I’ve received after spending time and money (lots) may I just add… on making myself look presentable in this corporate environment. Ok I’m really doing it for that weekend outing that we all got planned (you know how it goes right right!)

In all of this rant, there was a reason why I brought y’all here.

(Mix that British and American dialect now ladies)

Well basically, I just felt like someone (me) needed to provide some tips on how us black beautiful, Nubian queens goddesses cause you know we be royalty! And yes you amazing non-black people (cause you can learn something here too) should deal with such annoying questions and statements! I only have a few tips, but I’m sure you girls will be able to share some tips on how you deal with this situation so please, please girls, comment let us all share our stories on how we be dealing with these comments!


Don’t touch my hair, don’t touch my soul! – Literally!

I know I already mentioned Solange song but it an actual statement that needs to be heard! Have even seen people (non-black people may I add) listen to dance and actually twerk to this song (yes you’ve all seen Miley Cyrus right?)

I keep drifting sorry…. my point is that I personally think it’s okay to tell your colleagues not to touch your hair. Why not? You don’t know where there hands been! I think it’s how you say it may be an issue, but heck if you don’t someone gonna touch your expensive Afro (yes our hair is expensive ladies) or that extra virgin weave/hair that payed a lot of money for so girl you better tell em “don’t touch my hair”

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The comments just let them slide!

Lord knows I have to turn a blind eye when these stupid comments come my way! I remember when I just got these fresh and I mean fresh Ghana braids! I was feeling myself to then hear my colleague tell me that I looked like I had “snakes on my head” yes ladies read it again!

I’m sorry! But black hair is beautiful. It’s a masterpiece! You’re a “masterpiece” – Jazmin Sullivan (I’m just quoting lyrics today, but it’s needed) and I don’t appreciate you telling me that I look like I have snakes on my head. This one is not really for us sisters this is one for you Caucasian people, but if you do get those comments just let that one side please!

“No I don’t have snakes on my head. My hair was looking BRAND NEW and those comments are a big no no, because when Kim K be rocking that hairstyle it’s no longer snakes it’s called stylish! Why?!”

These people (you know who I mean) don’t mean it.

Okay this one is for you and me. I generally don’t think they mean to be mean, rude or ignorant. They are merely interested. I would say intrigued and damn right nosey but hey! we are amazing exotic people to them so we must represent when we are in the corporate world and educate those that lack the knowledge and exposure to the real world. And if they don’t understand just remind them of what “culture appreciation” is because you and I know it’s real (sips tea).

Be comfortable/confident in your hair style!

Yes girl be the Nubian Queen that you are rock that style! Slayyyyyy your hair. We all know that a woman’s hair is her masterpiece, her crown but this is something I am still trying to work really with. I have been on and off natural for about 3/4 years now and I can honestly say I still lack the confidence to rock my hair out naturally. It sits under that wig!

It’s sad I know but it’s me being very honest with you and myself. I even find it difficult having a new weave colour or braids because I hate the annoying comments/questions that come with it…. and I know I’m not the only one, but I know that this is a process and in time I will be able to slaaaaayyyy.

I hope these tips help you guys and as I’ve said please share some of your stories and tips!

Like Solange sings

Don’t touch my hair
When it’s the feelings I wear
Don’t touch my soul
When it’s the rhythm I know
Don’t touch my crown
They say the vision I’ve found
Don’t touch what’s there
When it’s the feelings I wear
They don’t understand
What it means to me
Where we chose to go
Where we’ve been to know
They don’t understand
What it means to me
Where we chose to go
Where we’ve been to know
You know this hair is my shit
Rode the ride, I gave it time
But this here is mine
You know this hair is my shit
Rode the ride, I gave it time
But this here is mine
What you say, oh?
What you say to me?
Don’t touch my pride
They say the glory’s all mine
Don’t test my mouth
They say the truth is my sound
They don’t understand
What it means to me
Where we chose to go
Where we’ve been to know
They don’t understand
What it means to me
Where we chose to go
Where we’ve been to know
You know this hair is my shit
Rode the ride, I gave it time
But this here is mine
You know this hair is my shit
Rode the ride, I gave it time
But this here is mine
What you say, oh?
What you say to me?

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