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10 Black-Owned Restaurants To Visit

So today is our first Black Pound Day (Saturday, June 27). With everything that has happened in the last few weeks, I think this is a day that we can and should take the time to support our community. And I think the best way to do it is through food! Why? Because everyone enjoys eating. 

What is Black Pound Day?

Black Pound Day (which will be a monthly event) encourages people to buy products from Black business owners in the UK. It was set up by Swiss a former So Solid Crew member! 

Below I have put together a list of Black-owned restaurants that are currently open for takeaways and delivery in the UK. 

 10 Black-Owned Restaurants to Visit in The UK 

1. Adian’s Dining – Birmingham 

A Birmingham Black-owned la carte restaurant that focuses on using amazing ingredients from all over the world that emphasises on the Caribbean, Asia and India foods. I will be certainly trying out this restaurant if I’m ever in Birmingham. 

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#ackee #riceandpeas #lobstermacncheese tropical fusion ?

A post shared by Adians Dining (@adiansdiningexperience) on

Location310-312 LADYPOOL ROAD, BIRMINGHAM, B12 8JY

2. ENISH – London

London wide Black-owned restaurants with a branch in Dubai. Enish serves a diverse range of Nigerian food.  I visited this restaurant at the beginning of this year and enjoyed it. If you are going, I would suggest trying some pepper soup or even the suya!

Location: 228 Lewisham High St, London, SE13 6JU

3. Caribbean Croft – Bristol 

A Black-owned restaurant based in Bristol. It servers traditional Caribbean comfort dishes. I’ve personally never been, but it looks like a good shout for whenever I may be in Bristol.

Location: 30 Stokes Croft, St Paul’s, Bristol BS1 3QD

4. Young Vegans Pizza Shop – London

A London Black-owned business that makes vegan mozzarella, mock meats and dough pizza. I usually do vegan for a month every year so at least now I know I have somewhere to try.

Location: 393 Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 9RA

5. Cafe Caribbean – London

A London based restaurant that makes all types of Jamaican food. Her recipes have been influenced by Content District, St Catherine, in Jamaica. 

Location: Pavilion Building, Old Spitalfields Market, London E1 6EW

6. Issa Vibe – London

A London Black-owned restaurant based in Peckham, serving all American food such as WingsWaffles, Fish, Burgers and Mac Cheese.

Location: 181 Rye Ln, Peckham, London SE15 4TP

7. Chukus – London

A London based Nigerian Tapas Restaurant. I haven’t yet been to this restaurant, but I will certainly be visiting after the Lockdown. 

Location: 274 High Road, Tottenham, N15 4AJ

8. Crepes & Cones – London 

A London based restaurant that offers a mix of savoury soul food with creative desserts & cocktails. Despite leaving so close to this place I still am yet to visit and enjoy! 

Location: 24-26 S End, Croydon CRO 1DN

9. TRIBE – London 

A South London based restaurant that serves healthy drinks and snacks from their juice bar. This restaurant is worth visiting for the vegans. 

Location: 22 Streatham High Rd, Streatham Hill, London SW16 1DB

10. Leilanis – London

A London based restaurant that serves Halal Caribbean food and other cultures. 

Location: 14 Lavender Hill, Battersea, London SW11 5RW

And there we have it! Which one of these Black-owned restaurants will you be attending? Do you know of any other Black-owned restaurants?

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11 Afrobeat Travel Lyrics for Your Instagram Captions

I love me some Afrobeats! Anything to get me moving and I tend to play at least one or two songs a day and more while I’m on holiday!

To tell you the truth, this post was inspired by Char of memoirsmusings.com. Her witness and banter is one not to be missed! I did ask her if I could do this post – please note she hasn’t done the genre Afrobeats but she has done many other particularly around Drake – check them out on her blog!

Have a look at the 15 afrobeat travel lyrics below, and if you have to share then leave in the comments below!

15 Afrobeat Travel Lyrics for Your Instagram Captions

1. Adekunle Gold – Before You Wake Up 

Let’s go away for 6 months twice in a year

2. WizKid Feat Femi Kuti – Jaiye Jaiye  

Lagos Today and London Tomorrow Oluwa Lo Seyi ( God has done this)

3. Davido – Assurance

She go follow go Atlanta. The cause disaster

4. Falz and Simi – Foreign  

I’m foreign, just call me foreign baby oh “international” 
Foreign baby, just call me foreign baby oh “I’m international” 
Foreign baby, just call me foreign baby oh “international” 
Foreign!

5. Cuppy ft Zlatan – Gelato  

I go take you to Italy, I go take you to America, Take you to London, I go bring you come Nigeria. Just to have some Gelato (Gelato)

6. Olamide – I Love Lagos  

If i carry you go banana 
My guy you go love lagos 
You go love lagos 
If i carry you go to elegushi 
you go love lagos ooo  

7. Burna Boy – Dangote  

When I dey move from Place to Place.  Wetin I dey find …? 

8. Mike Tyson ft Runtown- DrkoVibes  

We de spoil everwhere from Bolga to Canada …

9. Runtown – International Badman Killer

International Badman Killa , pull up in a benz she go reconisder.  

10. Ahann – Nana Peruzzi  

Tell me what is the time and place No holiday for you case

11. Teni – Billionaire

I wan chop life on Santorini…

Read:

afrobeat travel lyrics

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10 Places to Visit For the First Time Solo As A Black Female

I am always asked what countries are safe to travel as a black solo female. If we are real with each other, being a black female in this world can be extremely hard sometimes. So, it always makes sense when I’m asked what countries are safe to travel solo for the first time! I recently spoke on Travelling Perceptions & Safety: Why I don’t Allow the Experiences Stop me From Seeing The World?

As I said in that post and will say again … the media often likes to label black females, particularly in certain countries, that I won’t point out. We are often labelled as prostitutes, or even worst ghettoized for the colour of our skin. The melanin can be hard for them to handle sometimes.

When I travel by myself I never feel like I’m on my own. I have never really understood why, but I believe it’s because I always end up meeting someone on my solo travels. That’s not to say that I don’t emphasise with people that travel solo for the first time. I can imagine if you haven’t travelled solo before, it can be quite daunting. There are several countries or even places you can visit solo as a black female.

My cousin suggested that I write a post on places black females feel safe to travel too. So as I do. I have tapped into 10 black female travel bloggers, who share places they themselves felt safe travelling too! If you are a black female seeking to travel solo for the first time, I’m sure this post is for you. 

The melanin can be hard for them to handle sometimes.

10 Places You Should Travel Solo For the First Time As a Black Female Traveller

1. Char of Memoirs and Musings says – Dubai

Dubai is safe because the crime rate is low. You won’t find much petty crime here because it’s not a walkable city. Unwanted attention does exist but it’s more common in Deira and Bur Dubai. I’ve been to Dubai twice solo and not had any issues! ???

2. Aitza of Petitely Packaged says – Porto

As the second-largest city in Portugal, Porto offers a friendly and vibrant atmosphere. From wine tours in the Douro Valley, hiking at a nearby national park, hopping on a boat, or simply eating one’s way through the city their countless activities to meet people or get lost on your own in Porto. The public transportation is easy to navigate and English widely is spoken, so even if you find yourself unintentionally lost you likely won’t need Google to translate.

3. L of Franglais27 Tales says – Paris

Central Paris is rather compact and so it is easy to navigate by foot which makes it relatively safe for a solo woman traveller. Plus, there are lots of museums, galleries and other sights that are easy to visit or cinemas as well. There are also neighbouring cafés and restaurants in most locations meaning that it would not involve a long journey if venturing out in the evenings. You would just have to be as vigilant as you would be in London when travelling alone.

4. Elisha of Elisha Jade says – Shanghai and Bejing

I felt super safe in Shanghai and Beijing. Whether I was riding in the back of a tuk-tuk at 4 am or jumping on the metro, the Chinese metropolises were very secure. It is a surveillance state so you do trade off privacy for that sense of security.

5. Chi of Thoughts Of Chi says – Prague

I believe that Prague is safe due to it being a popular destination for tourists so it’s rare for you to feel secluded during a solo trip. Also from my trip, the attraction staff are very accommodating for solo travellers in terms of taking pictures of you and giving you in-depth talks about the city in general.

Also, the fact that there are a ton of attractions to go throughout the city and the transport links are reliable and easy to use.

6. Tay of TaytheTravelista says – Cartagena

I recently took my very first solo trip and as nervous as I was I couldn’t have made a better choice of destination – Cartagena. The people are extremely warm and welcoming and although they don’t speak much English, the love is felt! The streets are ALWAYS full of people, so you never really feel “alone”; and Uber/taxi makes it very easy to get around the city.

Cartagena is also very budget-friendly, so paying full price for things you’d normally split with a friend isn’t a big deal. Not to mention, Cartagena is pretty popular among solo travellers so the likelihood of you connecting with other solo travellers is extremely high. Just an FYI – you will fall head over heels in love with the place!!!

7. Joyce of Diy With Joy says – Phucket

I travelled to Phuket, Thailand for the ultimate solo birthday trip and purposely chose to stay in Patong for the first half of my trip as this beach resort town is famously known for its bustling nightlife, variety of activities, markets and plenty of restaurants. Although I was by myself, I never really felt alone because I met a lot of friendly faces from around the world and the Thai locals made me feel welcomed into their country. I felt really safe venturing out at night, often strolling through the night markets and had my first solo nightlife experience in Phuket which was surprisingly amazing!

8. Ri of Ri The Blog says – Colombia

I thought Colombia was safe because there was constantly police around everywhere (granted its Colombia they could be corrupt cops). The people seemed so relaxed about their belongings and that that to me was a sign that the city didn’t have problems with petty crime.

9. Tateendah of Footprints and Poetry says Tanzania

I found Tanzanians really friendly, no one catcalled me either in Dar Es Salaam or Zanzibar which is very rare. I didn’t book any tours and the resort I stayed in the capital helped me to arrange them, in Zanzibar they even walked me to the beach for my prison island tour.

Someone even offered to go with me to the South Island (as they were also going there) so I can get on the right public transport but I couldn’t stay that long. People were open to conversation if they spoke English, from the restaurants to the taxi drivers. The only issues I had was trying to convince people I don’t speak Swahili.

10. Victoria of The Stylish Trotter says Japan

I went to Japan solo but meeting people was a breeze with Couchsurfing & I felt so safe. This country is one of the most safest countries in the world because it is indeed safe. Transportation is accessible & easy. People are very cordial in Japan and you don’t feel people staring at you because you are a foreigner and black. It’s a win-win all around in my book.

Oh and one more! It wouldn’t be right if I didn’t suggest one of my own countries right?

Adebola of MyBreakingViews says Singapore

I think ya’ll get tired of me speaking about Singapore. It was the first country I travelled too as a student and to some degree as a solo traveller. As a student, I ended up living there with no trouble for 7 months! Honestly, Singapore has been the most welcoming country for me as a black female! I went back again this year after six years and couldn’t believe how welcoming it was. I wasn’t bothered when I walked around the city by myself.

P.S Get yourself some durian and tell me what you think? hahaha

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Black History Month: Why More Black People Should Give Blood

At 17 years old I became a blood donor. I won’t lie and say I wasn’t a little nervous. I had never donated blood before, and the nurse at the time complained she couldn’t find a vein. After my session, I remember feeling like I had done something powerful. I was giving blood which could potentially help someone and save their life.  

It is estimated that only 1% of England’s population that give blood is black. More people are in need to give blood from all communities and ethnic backgrounds, particularly those from a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) community. 

What is Sickle Cell?   

Sickle cell disease is a group of disorders that affects hemoglobin, the molecule in red blood cells that delivers oxygen to cells throughout the body. People with this disorder have atypical hemoglobin molecules called hemoglobin S, which can distort red blood cells into a sickle, or crescent, shape. 

What is Thalassaemia:

Thalassemia is a genetic blood disorder. People with Thalassemia disease are not able to make enough hemoglobin, which causes severe anemia. Haemoglobin is found in red blood cells and carries oxygen to all parts of the body. … Beta Thalassemia Major (also called Cooley’s Anemia) is a severe illness. 

Thalassaemia and Sickle Cell disease is blood conditions that most commonly affect people within the black, Asian and minority ethnic communities. The treatment of this condition is more successful using blood that is very closely matched to the patients. 

Why are more BAME donors needed? 

  1. Many patients receive frequent blood transfusions which require a much close match to their type of blood. 
  2. Many blood conditions, such as Sickle Cell or Thalassaemia, are usually treated by blood transfusions, most commonly affected in BAME communities.
  3. It is also noted that the best match typically comes from blood donors from the same ethnic background.

6 Reasons Why You Should be a Blood Donor As A Black Person:

While people from all communities and backgrounds do donate blood. There was still only an estimate of less than 5% of our blood donors that gave blood, which in the last year were from black, Asian and minority ethnic communities. I can imagine you can share reasons on why more people should donate blood, particularly black people, but for now, here are a few below.  

You will be saving someone’s life by giving your blood.  

This is true. According to GiveBloodNHS, it is estimated that 1,000 people in the UK have thalassaemia, and between 13,000-15,000 people in the UK have sickle cell disease.

Blood transfusions are in need, and if you can give blood and save a life. Why not? If you become a blood donor, you will be changing someone’s life.

Every blood donation can save or improve the lives of up to three adults or six, sometimes children.  

There are different blood groups  

There are different blood types, nearly more than 30 different types of blood groups.  During National Blood Week in June this year the letters A, O and B had dropped significantly. 

However, there are blood groups which are particularly vulnerable to shortfall such as O negative. It’s important to note that all patients can receive this blood in an emergency.

It’s for a charitable cause to give blood

Remember my little story where I gave blood at 17 years old? When I gave blood, I had a view that if I gave blood I would be making a difference.

Back then, I hated the idea of giving money to a charity. I had and still have several reasons why, but it mainly involved me not knowing where my money was going. I believed by giving blood I was genuinely making a difference.  

BAME DONORS ARE NEEDED 

It goes back to what I was saying earlier, BAME donors are significantly needed! Conditions such as sickle cell and thalassemia are also more likely to affect these communities with patients requiring regular blood transfusions ideally from donors from a similar ethnic background.  

It’s not as difficult as it sounds  

Although my first experience wasn’t the smoothest, I can honestly say after that it has been pretty straight forward. Giving blood can be quite straight forward if you want it to be. You can book an appointment online and can be in and out in less than half an hour.  

Black Travel Creators are collaborating with NHSGiveBlood for Black History Month

You may already know that October is Black History Month in the UK, so Black Travel Creators have decided to work with Give Blood NHS, to encourage more black people to give blood. We already have a date set for the 27th of October. This is for 15 blood donors, were we hope to encourage more black people to come on the day and give blood.

It doesn’t stop there! We hope to also raise awareness and encourage black people all over the world to register as a blood donor. ✈?

Interested? Then Register your details (if you haven’t already) and email your donor number to – blacktravelcreators@outlook.com We will then send more details for timings etc.

I have a few Black History Month Posts for Reading:

Black History Month: 10 Black Bloggers Making Modern Black History

10 Black History Month Events to Attend in 2019

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Black History Month: 10 Black Bloggers Making Modern Black History

Happy Black History Month!

I have never felt so compelled to be part or take notice of Black History Month until my unfortunate ordeal in Greece this year. Read the post – Arrested At The Acropolis: What Really Happened

It saddened me that people can see colour and not take time to actually see us for our truth and how amazing we are in the world. As black people, our history is raw, and it’s worth celebrating.

As black people, I don’t think we are celebrated enough, and as Black Bloggers, we are often left unnoticed. I wanted to use my platform today and showcase several black bloggers for Black History Month. Please read below the amazing black bloggers that are impacting our community!

Sarah Toyin

Black History Month is such a great time to celebrate the people that have made an impact in the black community but also remember what others have done to pave the way for us today! 

Sarah Toyin

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

As a black blogger, I would not really say I have faced any challenges perse directly. due to being a black blogger so I have nothing to contribute here. 

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

As a travel blogger at www.sarahtoyin.com. I provide information on teaching English in Korea, solo travel advice, general travel tips and guides as well as accommodation reviews and tips. Blogging has challenged me and helped me grow as an individual because I  am here to serve and help people with their travels.

It is not actually about me but how I can make others lives easier through the information I am providing. This has allowed me to think of others more than myself and that is how I have grown as an individual through blogging.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?  

This is an interesting question,  perhaps blog about it more, putting on events to celebrate it. and collaborations like this. As much as I love that there is a month for black history, I would really love for us to celebrate the history we have all year round.

YasminTells

I know its cheesy to say but every month is Black History month to me. I make a conscious effort to support black owed businesses whenever I can, all year round.

Yasmin Tells

I’m a travel blogger who focuses on travel in West Africa in particular. I relocated from the UK to the country of my origin Sierra Leone 10 months ago and I use the platform to share information and tips on Sierra Leone. I also used to work in Senegal so I have some information on there alongside other neighbouring countries such as my trip to Ghana last month for the Chale Wote Festival.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

As its new industry, I find myself cultivating and trying to understand it like many bloggers. I haven’t faced any challenges as of yet if I’m completely honest. However, I am aware of cases of black bloggers being paid less in the industry. But tell me something new!

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

I think it has in many ways subconsciously affected my thought processes, for example, I pay attention to detail more than I used to. That could be because I’m a content creator, I think more about the why, the outcome and the experience. I do believe all of these factors come from the art of storytelling also known today as blogging.

Mellissa The Island Girl

Black history month is about celebrating all that’s black. It’s about black people also educating themselves about their past- not slavery but all the great ways that we have contributed to the advancement of the human race. It is a month to remember how great we are both women and men. If we unite, we can be even greater. It is a time to rediscover the love that we should have for our melanin. We are a beautiful group of varied people. We are creative, we are strong, and we are resilient. 

Melissa The Island Girl

I’m a travel, fashion and lifestyle blogger/content creator. You can find me at www.theislandgirl.co.uk.  

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

 My blog has made me braver. I’m more fearless and I’m learning to not worry about what others may think of me or what I am doing. I have attended events alone and have met some wonderful people. I’ve connected with people on Instagram and Twitter. I have become more expressive. Through content creation, I am exposed to different mediums of capturing moments. Most importantly my blog is helping me to discover me. I am definitely learning about myself-all the things I am capable of doing and all the inner boundaries I am able to push. 

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

To be honest, just like this. Highlighting how much of us there are in these creative spaces and giving us a voice and a platform to be seen and heard. Thank you for sharing this brilliant idea of featuring other black bloggers! 

JennasWorldView

Our history is too rich, royal and powerful to be condensed in one month. I make it a point to celebrate my blackness everyday. However I do appreciate that our history does have its own space on the calendar. But we shouldn’t wait until October (UK) & February(US) to celebrate our greatness. Its an everyday thing.

Jennas World View

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

Blogging has stretched me. It’s been my personal therapy that has helped me understand so much about myself and my journey of womanhood and blackness. Being able to use my personal experiences for content has allowed me to reflect on a deeper level. In addition to that running a self-hosted blog has taught me lots of new transferable skills. I’m constantly learning.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

I think that the black blogging community shouldn’t shy away from creating content that showcases our community. The power in our creative minds is next level phenomenal. We have the ability to bring our stories, views, experiences, current news to life. We should always aim to control the narrative and not be afraid to create content that promotes, edifies and educates those within our community. Nobody knows our stories better than we do. Black history month is the best time for all of us to contribute.

Cynthia Clarke

Black History month is an opportunity to “showcase”.  There are so many Black people who have done and are doing phenomenal things and we often don’t get to hear about that unless someone is being “showcased”.  It’s a time to celebrate how special we are, how talented we are, how resilient we are, how smart we are, and how beautiful we are! 

Cynthia Clarke

During my travels, I see and meet a lot of people but I don’t see as many black people as I would like, especially if I’m travelling somewhere other than the Caribbean. With Sojourner Moxie, I’m seeking to change that narrative by providing travel tips, destination travel guides, step by step instructions on how to start travelling, inspiration, and showcasing out of the box adventures. It’s a big world out there…let’s go check it out!  Another issue some Black women may face in regards to travel is finding someone to travel with.  Through my travels, I‘m showing them it’s ok to travel solo.  www.sojournermoxie.com

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

Good question! As a blogger, you are always reading other blogs, and if you’re not careful the tendency to compare yourself to others will hinder your progress.  My blogging journey has solidified my sense of self and what I have to offer.  The woman who is in her 40s and above, the woman who is now an empty nester, the woman who’s been married for decades and is now divorced…that’s my audience!  That’s who I want to reach.  I have to be authentic to do that.  Every day, I’m determined to be true to that.  That’s continual growth.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

I like what you’re doing!  Bringing Black voices together and showing the length and breadth of what we bring to the table.  I’m even thinking of doing something like this in the travel space.  Every blogger wants to be successful, but Black History Month is a great time to say look at my sister, look at my brother…see what they’re doing…they’re changing the game and it’s a beautiful thing!!!

Gabby Beckford

In three words, I would say pride, representation, and hope. Black bloggers need more visibility than ever these days, and representation absolutely matters. We are no longer fighting for tolerance, we are fighting for acceptance and celebration. Black History Month is an opportunity to show the world that yes, we’re still here thriving, working, and succeeding! Many of us! In abundance! And that is powerful.

Gabby Beckford

I am a travel and lifestyle blogger—the main functions of my platform at the moment are writing helpful and entertaining travel articles and sharing funded travel opportunities I call Packs Light Travel Opps. These opportunities are travel grants for international experiences such as conferences, fellowships, study abroad, internships, and more. I won more than $69,000 in scholarships in college much of which helped me travel, so it’s a passion of mine to advocate and share this resource with my followers! You can find me on all social media platforms as @packslight, and on my blog at www.packslight.com.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

One of the biggest issues facing black bloggers is to pay discrepancies. Brands will pay other (often white or lighter-skinned) influencer considerably more than me when we are working the same campaign at the same time. I’m happy that most of the time, other influencers are open to sharing how much they are making so I can know about the unfair pay and address it. There have been times I worked pro-bono for a large company when they said they didn’t have a budget just to find out another non-Black influencer was paid. It’s ridiculous, unfair, and unendingly frustrating.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

Blogging has definitely transformed my mind into one of business. I see a system for every action, a collaboration with every meeting, and a window for every closed door. Networking is fun for me now! Blogging specifically about travel has also made me so much more appreciative of my life and aware of my privilege. I love to travel, and I love to encourage other people to travel. Sometimes it’s not that simple, and blogging has been an invaluable tool in my reflection and growth over the past 6 years.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

Lifting each other up is the best way. Taking this month as an opportunity to promote other Black bloggers and creatives, cross-pollenate the black-blogger-love between your followers and watch the magic that happens! By sharing others, they share you. And also, writing about it. Talking about it. Showing our followers that we do care about Black History Month, it matters in 2019, and we need to take note of it and it’s the true meaning of community!

Saabirah Lawrence

Black History Month for me is a time to remember the individuals that have paved the way for us as a community today. It’s also a great time to discover and celebrate the individuals that are doing great things for the black community right now.

Saabirah Lawrence

When I started out I pretty much wrote about anything and everything, from makeup to social issues and at the time it made sense as I have many interests. Now I only focus on a few topics: wellness, empowerment, lifestyle and natural hair. I try to keep my content within those topics but I have found that I really enjoy sharing my blogging experience and any advice for other bloggers. 

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

I think my biggest challenge is finding brands/companies that I actually want to work with. As a black blogger, I find my go-to when it comes to brand collaborations is black-owned businesses. This obviously isn’t a bad thing, sometimes It just means the budget for work is smaller but If I see the vision I am totally on board. I just find it hard to know where I stand as a black woman with a lot of major brands. It’s a big turn off for me to see brands throwing the words ”diverse” and ”inclusive” into their campaigns when really it is all just surface level. there is no real work being done to challenge the industry’s views on working with black bloggers.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

As I started writing about wellness, it has really made me become more self-aware and open to bettering myself. Mostly for me but I also think having a better understanding of myself and more confidence will make me a better writer. Blogging has definitely helped me find my voice, explore my creative side and meet some amazing people.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month? 

I think the black blogging community has been a useful source of information during black history month. It’s important to use this time of the month to highlight what is happening during black history month (events, films, new product/service launches, workshops, popups, etc), highlight some important and inspiring black figures and has conversations that need to be had within the community.

Debbie Adigun

When I think of Black History Month, I think about what I learnt about black history in school. Slavery. That’s all we learnt as if that is all Black history is.

So, for me, Black History Month is a reminder that we need to educate ourselves about our history. Although it shouldn’t be restricted this month alone, this is a time to celebrate our black heroes, look back on how far we’ve come and reflected on how we can do better in the future.

WanderlustCalls

I am a Travel and Lifestyle Blogger who achieved my goal to visit 25 countries before I turned 25. I use my blog to try to help and inspire people to step out of their comfort zones and to travel more. Like many, I love to experience a little luxury without breaking the bank, so I share tips on how to do bougie travel on a budget.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

One challenge that I have faced as a black blogger is turning up to events and being the only black person in the room. It’s not even an exaggeration when I say that sometimes I’ve been in a room and felt unwelcomed by others in the room. I literally felt like an outcast. There are so many talented black bloggers, so seeing events like this really frustrates me. 

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

I’m extremely shy and blogging has really forced me out of my comfort zone. If you told a younger Debbie that I would one day put myself out there both online and off, I would never have believed it. But here, I am doing that on a regular basis. Even though I am still mad shy, it makes me realise how far I have come.

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?

I think that black bloggers can use their platforms to share a different narrative to the one that we are bombarded with by the media. We can share black stories, uplift black people and collaborate with other black bloggers and businesses. This shouldn’t just be restricted to Black History Month. This should be a regular thing.

Jess Anyan-Brown


Black History Month is a great time to reflect on all the great things black people have done to contribute to the UK and just in general! The list is endless! I remember being in primary school and it was a time when we had posters around the school and put on events during assembly for this and this was special as 90% of the school at the time were black. However, I feel that it should all just be taught and thought about all year round (not just one month) and I hope to see this happen one day. 

Jess


I blog about travel and culture my website – www.roadtoculturedom.com  because I believe that you can find culture wherever you travel to (domestically or internationally) and I want to inspire others to do so through my experiences.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

I feel like the challenges faced as a black blogger for me started with the lack of representation in mainstream travel spaces. When I started my journey, I had to search hard to find this and it gives the impression that you’ll have to work extra hard to have the same chance. This has changed as I got to know the black travel community more and connect with incredible bloggers both in the UK and abroad. I love how we are actively trying to change the diversity of travel and creating our own tables!

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?  

The black blogging community is doing well to bring Black History Month through social media, events etc. It is not just to other blacks people but everyone else who is interested and wants to understand the black culture more. I feel like once we start making black history month something that is celebrated all year round. This will do wonders to change how the Western World perceives black history. Social media is very powerful so anything is possible. 

DiyWithJoy

Black history month is empowering to me. But it means so much more than celebrating for a month. It means every day I can unapologetically celebrate my beautiful melanated whole self, black people around me and the historical black people before me who paved the way so I have a voice, a voice of freedom.

DiyWithJoy

As a travel, food and lifestyle blogger on www.diywithjoy.com, I create content to inspire and encourage a community to find more joy in travelling and cooking, life & wellbeing. I love creating delicious and nutritious recipes inspired by travelling as I explore different palates and flavours globally. I share tips on how to #travelsmart, solo travel tips to inspire more people, especially women to take the first step to travel solo, travel stories and advice while having an enriching experience and discovering the beauty of the world through my lens. You can catch up with the Diywithjoy platform on TwitterInstagram and Facebook.

What are the difficulties/challenges you have faced as a black blogger?

I feel that one of the challenges I have faced as a black blogger is that not everyone will like the content that you produce and that’s okay. This year I have really found my niche, my tribe and growing community in the blogging world and they have helped me understand what my audience would like to see more of from me.

How has blogging made you think and grow as an individual?

My blogging journey has helped me grow immensely in many ways as an individual. It has helped me strengthen my writing skills. Before blogging, I used to think I wasn’t much of a writer and more or a mathematician as I’m an engineer. I used to say to myself that I was better with numbers than words. Blogging has aided my cultivation for content writing and now I can boldly say to myself that I’m a great writer. Blogging has helped me become more organised, disciplined and accountable. It has also given me the courage to launch my travel business and has helped develop my confidence to put myself out there and network with other people which I am really grateful for.     

How do you think the black blogging community can contribute more to Black History Month?  

The black blogging community is really powerful and I think we can contribute more to Black history month but continuing to support one another, share more opportunities with each other and raise more awareness on why black history month is important and why it should be championed. 

And with that, I would like to say…

Happy Nigerian Independence Day

I hope you enjoyed reading about these amazing women and their journeys. Are your celebrating Black History Month? Check places to go – Read: 10 Black History Month Events to Attend in 2019

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10 Black History Month Events to Attend in 2019

Black History Month was first celebrated in the United Kingdom in 1987. It was organised through the leadership of Ghanaian analyst Akyaaba Addai-Sebo. He had served as a coordinator of special projects for the Greater London Council (GLC) and created a collaboration to get it underway.

Black History Month happens in October every year. Although it started 30 years ago, I never felt like celebrated the month as I should. Which for me has always been a shame. Throughout historyblack people have been discriminated against and treated badly because of the colour of their skin.

This year I wanted to dedicate my blog to Black History Month. I want to shed light on the good things we are doing as a community. I will be posting a blog feature called – Black History Month: 10 Black Bloggers Making Modern Black History

Today I want to share a few Black History Month Events that will be happening across the UK.

10 Black History Month Events in 2019

1. Launch of Civil Service Wide Black History Month Celebration 2019 – London

Interested in Civil Service? The Civil Service Race Forum and the BEIS Faith and Minority Ethnic Network (FAME) are bringing to you the launch event for Black History Month 2019. With a theme of ‘Involve to Evolve’, join us for a day full of keynote speeches and panels. It will address important questions of how we should be tackling race issues. To evolve the Civil Service into a more representative, diverse and inclusive workforce. For more info and tickets.

Cost: Free

Date: 1 October

2. Black History River Cruise 5th October – London

A three-hour cruise along the Thames from Temple to Vauxhall to Greenwich. There will highlights on the hidden African/Caribbean history on display. For more info and tickets.

Cost: £36

Date: 5 October

N.B I will be going to this event myself. If you would like to join me please do let me know.

3. Black History Month African-Caribbean Fusion Festival – Portsmouth

The African-Caribbean Fusion Festival will be held at the University of Portsmouth Eldon Building from 12:00-5:00 pm. It is being organised by the Portsmouth Black History Committee. A day to celebrate the heritage, culture and diversity of the local African-Caribbean community. For more info and tickets.

Cost: Free

Date: 5 October

4. What’s Her Story? A Black History Month Workshop – London

Black Women’s History- What’s Her Story? aims to raise awareness of the key African and Caribbean female figures in British history from the Roman era to the present day. Through discovery and discussion that celebrates these women’s lives and their contributions to our history. For more info and tickets

Cost: Free

Date: 15 October

5. One Africa Networking – Birmingham

One Africa Network (OAN) will be holding an event for like-minded business professionals and entrepreneurs in Birmingham. Attending our monthly events is an excellent way to strengthen relationships, share innovative ideas, insights, career and new business opportunities. Opportunites to speed network with other delegates and share inspiring ideas. For more info and tickets

Cost: Free

Date: 25 October

6. Comedy Shutdown Wolves Wolverhampton

Check out some of the best Urban Comedians in the great settings of the Belgrade Theatre Coventry. On the night you have the ferociously quick-witted Kane Brown. The veteran comedy Host Kat B, Smash Entertainz from Belly Buss Comedy and our favourite Auntie Maureen Younger. For more info and tickets

Cost: £15.00

Date: 26 OctoberWolverhampton, 19 October Leicester and 18 October Coventry

7. ”African Cultural Event 2019” Cambridge

Cambridge African Network, as part of its celebration of Black History Month 2019, is hosting a full day two-part family event. For more info and tickets.

Cost: £0 – £13.52

Date: 12 October

8. Telling Tales: Black History MonthNorthampton

From poets to storytellers, The University of Northampton and the wider Northampton(shire) community is filled with artistic talent.

On October 28, will be celebrating some talent with the latest session of Telling Tales, the Library’s very own Telling Tales: Black History Month. For more info and tickets.

Cost: Free

Date: 29 October

9. Pressure – London

Celebrate Black History Month with our screening of Britain’s first black film. Set in 70s London, Pressure tells the story of Tony, a bright school-leaver and son of West Indian immigrants, who finds himself torn between his parents’ church-going conformity and his brother’s Black Power militancy. A vivid account of the cultural tensions between the Windrush generation and their children, now native to Britain, Pressure is powered by raw, authentic performances and political bite. For more info and tickets.

Cost: £8.50 for under 25s £5.00

Date: 9 October

10. Discussion Panel – Saying it Proud, Saying it in Black – London

50th Anniversary celebrations for Bogle-L’Ouverture. Publication for a radical London-based publishing company founded in 1968 by Guyanese activists Jessica Huntley and Eric Huntley.

Chaired by Beverley Mason, this discussion with guest speakers Eric Huntley and Leila Howe will explore the radical power of Blackness. Black publishing and the role of bookshops in the Black community.

Cost: £10.00

Date: 6 October

A Bonus Event: My Experience With {Pastor Of Comedy} MCOJB – Kent

An award-winning international stand up comedian, event host, Master of ceremony, actor, an entertainer and mentor. Mc OJB is a household name, and humour merchant. He began his comedy career in the university, where he got his name Pastor Of Comedy and has since graced stages with international comedians like Julius Agwu, Senator, Alibaba, Gordons D Berlusconi, AY (Ayo Makun), Comedian Accapella, Bovi to mention a few. For more info and tickets.

Cost: £20.00 VIP £50.00

Date: 13 October

Will you be celebrating Black History Month this year? What will you be doing? Do you have any events that you would like to share?

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